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  #151  
Old 01-16-2016, 06:23 PM
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1914 Polo Gounds - No.
Tested one and it split in half. I guess two halves are glued together on this issue.
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  #152  
Old 01-18-2016, 07:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1952boyntoncollector View Post
If you are doing something to the card that you do not disclose to the buyer than you are doing something wrong...

to me soaking worse than 'schilling' that everyone is angry about...

fine to soak if you disclose it to the buyer.....if not a big deal then the buyer will pay the same no?

You can do it to your own cards but eventually they will reach the secondary market....
If you are a pre-war baseball card collector, and have lots of cards, you have some that have been soaked. Saying soaking is worse than shill bidding is crazy to me.

Back to topic, T207s soak fine!!
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  #153  
Old 01-18-2016, 08:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon View Post
If you are a pre-war baseball card collector, and have lots of cards, you have some that have been soaked. Saying soaking is worse than shill bidding is crazy to me.

Back to topic, T207s soak fine!!
I didn't see T211s listed, but they soak fine, too.
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  #154  
Old 01-20-2016, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jburl View Post
I didn't see T211s listed, but they soak fine, too.
I soaked a T217 and had no problems.
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  #155  
Old 01-20-2016, 11:38 AM
Mikehealer Mikehealer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon View Post
Saying soaking is worse than shill bidding is crazy to me.
I agree Leon, that is a ridiculous statement.
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  #156  
Old 02-19-2016, 08:20 PM
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Has anyone tried a glossy photo type card? I have some R311's with major scrapbook pages attached that I would love to get off of there.
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  #157  
Old 03-31-2016, 06:58 PM
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quick question:

i have a 62 venezuelan herb score that has some album left on it.

can this issue be done?



i know nothing about soaking* and would normally consider it taboo for post war cards.

prewar, i totally get and i think the venezuelans fall into the prewar category considering many of them were affixed to albums as well.

anyways, any helps and/or tips are appreciated.


* i have read a few threads on the actual process but have never attempted one.

Last edited by begsu1013; 03-31-2016 at 06:58 PM.
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  #158  
Old 04-01-2016, 12:45 PM
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Soaking Wheaties hand cuts is an absolute disaster.
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  #159  
Old 04-01-2016, 02:41 PM
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Sam & Mike - I have great luck with everything from cards to old programs that have been glued in scrapbooks by using a stack of Q-tips and a bowl of water.

I slowly soak the paper or glue with a little water on the Q-tip and then let it sit for a minute or two. I then check the paper with tweezers or my fingernail to see if it is loose or softened. If not I add a little more moisture and continue to do so until it comes off.

If it is simply glue spots I dab them with a paper towel. I once did an entire 1953/54 Parkhurst hockey set that way and they honestly looked like they had never been glued.

Of course some glues just can not be dissolved by water.
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  #160  
Old 12-01-2019, 05:42 PM
JT1962 JT1962 is offline
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Default Shilling

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Originally Posted by 1952boyntoncollector View Post
shilling happens too......so its fine as well with that logic..
Shilling is actually against the law, it is consider a form of fraud. 15 years ago or so the FBI arrested a couple guys on EBay for shilling. They raised prices for 2-4 years 3-8 million dollars, if I remember correctly. To say shilling is not any worse than soaking. That is only based on your own personal logic, which is idiotic.

Last edited by JT1962; 12-01-2019 at 08:23 PM.
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  #161  
Old 12-01-2019, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by JT1962 View Post
Shilling is actually against the law, it is consider a form of fraud. 15 years ago or so the FBI arrested a couple guys on EBay for shilling. They raised prices for 2-4 years 3-8 million dollars, if I remember correctly. To say shilling is not any worse than soaking. That is only based on your own personal logic, which is idiotic.

There is no law against doctoring baseball cards either. It doesn't make it right.

I don't know how anyone can justify soaking baseball cards in water or any other chemical (yes, water is a chemical).
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  #162  
Old 12-04-2019, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by the 'stache View Post
+1 to this, Alex. I'm too scared to soak any of my cards. I know a bunch of you guys have done so successfully, but with my luck, I'd be the rare exception, and destroy a piece of history. And even if it was only some $50 card, I'd want to punch myself in the face a few times.
I had the same fears regarding q 1955 Topps card that I was considering soaking. I went to ebay and found a 2 low cost 55s with glue stains that were perfect candidates for soak.

My experiments resulted in not so great results as the glue/stain removal resulted in paper loss on both of my attempts.

So I'm not sure if 55s overall are not good candidates in general or if I really didnt do it correctly - I have stopped "experimenting"
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  #163  
Old 12-04-2019, 01:13 PM
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I love when threads from 3-1/2 years ago get bumped! I still have yet to soak any of the cards in my collection. But I still have some old albums and a few cards that have significant paper/glue residue. I might give it a go soon enough, but still feel uneasy about the idea of soaking. It still feels like an alteration in my opinion.
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  #164  
Old 12-04-2019, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ejharrington View Post
I don't know how anyone can justify soaking baseball cards in water or any other chemical (yes, water is a chemical).
Quite a few people on this thread clearly approve of soaking and some even give helpful suggestions to avoid damaging the cards. To me, soaking is completely fine...you are removing material that was not there at the time of production and was not intended to be on the card. The cards were mean to be held and enjoyed. Clearly, the backs were meant to be read, hence the advertising. Thank goodness for soaking or else many of us would not have a significant portion of the cards in our collections to enjoy.
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  #165  
Old 12-04-2019, 02:36 PM
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If soaking is acceptable practice then so should cleaning via other methods?
Not challenging the stance here. I just think its a simple yes or no for cleaning (without chemicals). If people want to argue the technicalities then I disagree since it's over complicating the situation. It should be a general rule of thumb if a stance is taken here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldOriole View Post
Quite a few people on this thread clearly approve of soaking and some even give helpful suggestions to avoid damaging the cards. To me, soaking is completely fine...you are removing material that was not there at the time of production and was not intended to be on the card. The cards were mean to be held and enjoyed. Clearly, the backs were meant to be read, hence the advertising. Thank goodness for soaking or else many of us would not have a significant portion of the cards in our collections to enjoy.
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  #166  
Old 12-04-2019, 02:42 PM
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A decent percentage of PreWW2 cards we own at one time came from a scrapbook. I have no problem with soaking them out with water, and have done so in the past.

The one set of cards that I had extra poor results from the soaking process was the V61 Neilson's Chocolates. The glossy coating on the front got very hazy after the soak, and pretty much ruined the look of the cards.

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  #167  
Old 12-04-2019, 03:54 PM
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I bought a 55 Topps Clemente a couple years ago that had a weird, wavy warp in the cardboard. There was not any glue or anything stuck to the back of the card. It almost looked like it got wet at some point years ago, like maybe in an old shoebox of cards in a basement (that's how I envisioned it) and then dried funky.

I hadn't soaked any of the 50's topps cards before, so I tried a common 55T 'beater'. It survived the process, so I gave Roberto a bath for 15-20 minutes and it dried perfect, without any of the warping problems it previously had. It now resides in a PSA 4.5 holder and looks great.
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  #168  
Old 12-04-2019, 03:59 PM
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  #169  
Old 12-04-2019, 04:57 PM
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Does anyone know if 1914 CJ's have issues with soaking? I know it was mentioned earlier but i'm curious since i've seen quite a few of these 1914's that have a wave in the stock. They arent completely flat. Likely attributed to the thin stock. But i'm curious if that's an indicator for soaking as well.
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  #170  
Old 12-04-2019, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goudey77 View Post
Does anyone know if 1914 CJ's have issues with soaking? I know it was mentioned earlier but i'm curious since i've seen quite a few of these 1914's that have a wave in the stock. They arent completely flat. Likely attributed to the thin stock. But i'm curious if that's an indicator for soaking as well.
i've soaked 15's. I think the key with 14's as with any soak is to make sure you are pressing the card while drying properly.
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  #171  
Old 12-06-2019, 03:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Runscott View Post
Until we see Todd's soak-o-meter, it is as irrelevent as wiping a booger off a card, which I hope no one would object to.
Unless it was Mr. Christy Mathewson's Booger ~
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  #172  
Old 12-06-2019, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by irishdenny View Post
Unless it was Mr. Christy Mathewson's Booger ~
Wiping booger’s is evidence of alteration. Or better known as N-b00G under PSA guidelines. The DNA sample left from snot cannot be removed without foreign substances.
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  #173  
Old 12-07-2019, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by brianp-beme View Post
A decent percentage of PreWW2 cards we own at one time came from a scrapbook. I have no problem with soaking them out with water, and have done so in the past.

The one set of cards that I had extra poor results from the soaking process was the V61 Neilson's Chocolates. The glossy coating on the front got very hazy after the soak, and pretty much ruined the look of the cards.
No 'Before' scan, but did find an 'After' scan...Ouch!

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  #174  
Old 12-07-2019, 09:23 PM
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i wouldn't soak a Mello Mint!
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  #175  
Old 02-27-2020, 08:27 PM
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Default Ogden’s Tabs or Guinea Golds

Has anyone ever soaked an Ogden’s Tabs or Guinea Gold? (British tobacco cards from around 1900.) If so, what was your experience? Thanks.
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  #176  
Old 03-02-2020, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by plastic.dog View Post
Has anyone ever soaked an Ogden’s Tabs or Guinea Gold? (British tobacco cards from around 1900.) If so, what was your experience? Thanks.
The 1901 Guinea Gold looks to be a photographic card. I don't think I would be soaking those. I might use a wet Q tip to remove a blob of dirt otherwise. Others might know more as I haven't soaked any. They are blank backed. This is a pic from ebay. Biot sure about the others you asked aboiut.
And welcome to the forum.
ps...this is a 6 yrs old thread
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  #177  
Old 03-02-2020, 10:19 AM
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Could someone post or PM me the step by step process of soaking ? Time involved, type of water, time to dry, pressure on card, etc. I have no idea at this time how to do it, I have never tried it. Thanks
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  #178  
Old 03-02-2020, 10:54 AM
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Here is a pretty detailed account of the process posted previously on this site by David K.

Brian


I've soaked many trade cards over the last 20 years, including full and partial scrapbook pages, as well as a smaller number of T206s and other tobacco cards. How successful a soaking is depends largely on what type of glue was used, and you never really know that until the soaking is under way; however, the skill of the soaker also plays a part. Here's how I do it:

* I generally use a wide, shallow baking pan, though this partly has to do with the fact that most trade cards are bigger than tobacco cards, so putting them in a glass, as the original poster showed, won't really work. That's especially true for full scrapbook pages, which is how I got my start soaking more than 20 years ago.

* I fill it at least half an inch to an inch deep with warm-to-hot tap water. I've found that water from my kitchen faucet at its hottest setting is fine for soaking, and will not damage cards.

* I put the card or cards flat in the water with the paper/glue side up. You may see bubbling when the glue hits the hot water, but that's not necessary for a successful soak. If a card keeps floating to the surface rather than staying completely underwater, I may use a spoon to hold it down, leaning the spoon handle on the side of the pan.

* I generally let the cards soak for at least 5 or 10 minutes, unless the paper starts separating from the card all by itself. I'll try at this point, using my fingers or a Q-tip, to see if the paper is starting to come off. If it is, I'll do what I can to separate it from the card, carefully, always watching to make sure there's no paper being lost from the back of the card. If there is, I'll stop and let it soak some more.

* If the paper isn't coming off after 5 or 10 minutes, I'll let the card soak for another 15 or 20 minutes and try again as above. If the paper is coming off, great; if not, I let it soak some more. Once the water has cooled down to room temperature, I'll take the cards out, put them on a paper towel, refill the pan with warm-to-hot water as above, and put the cards back in to soak. I've sometimes had to do this multiple times and soak cards for over an hour. If that's what it takes, that's what you need to do.

* If the paper doesn't come completely off in one piece, I may need to try getting it off gradually, using my finger or (usually better) a Q-tip. This is where skill and experience comes in. You don't want to scrape it too hard, thus making the chance of paper loss much greater, but sometimes you need to rub at the paper and glue repeatedly until it starts to come off bit by bit. I always watch carefully for signs of paper loss at this point, and stop if I see any. I'll try soaking some more before trying again, but sometimes you encounter a glue that's not going to come off without some damage.

* After all the paper is off, I rub the back of the card with my finger or a Q-tip to get all the glue off. You can usually tell when it's off, because the back of the card stops being slippery or sticky (as it is when there's still glue). If you don't get the glue off before drying the card, you'll have problems.

* I press the cards between two paper towels in order to soak up as much of the water as possible.

* I then put a fresh paper towel on a book or other flat surface, put the cards on it, put another fresh paper towel on top of them, and then put a stack of books (or another flat, heavy object) on top of that.

* I let the cards dry for at least three or four days, changing the paper towels after the first day. When they're done drying, I remove the paper towels carefully, making sure none of the paper is sticking to the cards (which may mean there was some glue left on the cards).
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  #179  
Old 03-02-2020, 11:45 AM
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Default Two sides of a similar coin

I am going to preface my statement by saying that I understand the difference between the card scandals running rampant in the high grade cards currently and this, but I still have an issue how this thread is so openly accepted and people who trim, recolor, or alter cards are blasted. If the card is staying in your collection, you can do whatever you want to it, the gray area comes in when the intent is to resell the card. Soaking cards compromises the genuine integrity of the card for one benefit, to remove part of it's story to increase the value. Apples to apples with pressing, trimming and recoloring. In a truly benign question, can someone explain how this is any different than a non-acceptable method of card alteration?
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  #180  
Old 03-02-2020, 12:17 PM
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If the card is staying in your collection, you can do whatever you want to it, the gray area comes in when the intent is to resell the card.
Many would argue that the latter (the card finding it's way back on to the open market) is inevitable. None of us really "own" anything. The cards belong to the hobby, and each of us is just a shepherd of our respective collections, therefore none of us have the right to alter anything for next "owner", regardless of how far in the future that is.

There is also the argument that undoing something that was done (removing glue, paper, writing, etc) is not as looked down on as, say, trimming.

It gets pretty mind-f*cky. I think that political leanings also have something to do with it.

That was a joke, people. Lighten up.

I personally think it's dangerous to subscribe to an all or nothing approach for anything. I'm generally a "don't touch it" guy, but concede there are instances where action might be prudent.
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  #181  
Old 03-02-2020, 12:25 PM
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It gets pretty mind-f*cky.
Well put, that is why I had to lob it out there. All that said, I buy cards that look like they were not only chewed on by the dog, but fully processed, if you catch my meaning. It is one of the posts that when it comes back to the surface doesn't sit super well with me in a hypocritical sense. But again, what the hell do I know, just had to ask the question.
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  #182  
Old 03-02-2020, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by yanks87 View Post
I am going to preface my statement by saying that I understand the difference between the card scandals running rampant in the high grade cards currently and this, but I still have an issue how this thread is so openly accepted and people who trim, recolor, or alter cards are blasted. If the card is staying in your collection, you can do whatever you want to it, the gray area comes in when the intent is to resell the card. Soaking cards compromises the genuine integrity of the card for one benefit, to remove part of it's story to increase the value. Apples to apples with pressing, trimming and recoloring. In a truly benign question, can someone explain how this is any different than a non-acceptable method of card alteration?
Here's the analogy I would give on this one. Imagine that you had a 1963 Corvette that you are going to sell as completely factory original. On the way to the auction, a bird poops on the hood of the car. What do you do? Clearly, most people would say that they would take a wet cloth and wipe it off. Is the car altered or any less original at that point? Certainly not.

Now imagine instead that before you took it to the auction, you touched up some paint scratches and replaced some small pieces of bumper trim that were damaged. Is the car less original then? Yes, obviously it is as you have added/altered original parts of the car with substances that were NOT part of the original composition.

To me, that is the simple difference between soaking a card and altering it otherwise.
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  #183  
Old 03-02-2020, 01:03 PM
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OK, I kinda get that analogy, but at the same time I think it only holds up for something like rubber cement which can in most cases be rubbed off (hey now!), but when the card as a whole has to be dipped to remove glue, I think it gets in the gray area of doing overall damage to the integrity of the card.

So using your analogy, you would clean the bird poop off the '63 by submerging the entire car in water to remove it. Though you have removed the blemish, you have compromised the card as a whole in the process.

Splitting hairs I guess, but I feel it is a bigger deal than just a surface removal, and either way, the card is altered in my opinion.
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  #184  
Old 03-02-2020, 01:12 PM
marcdelpercio marcdelpercio is offline
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Well, actually I would cover the car in water to clean it quite often. I mean, that's basically the definition of washing a car, right? If you were to purchase the car in my analogy, would you expect that the seller should disclose every time the car was washed in the past 60 years? Do you consider that "compromising" the car?
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  #185  
Old 03-02-2020, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yanks87 View Post
OK, I kinda get that analogy, but at the same time I think it only holds up for something like rubber cement which can in most cases be rubbed off (hey now!), but when the card as a whole has to be dipped to remove glue, I think it gets in the gray area of doing overall damage to the integrity of the card.

So using your analogy, you would clean the bird poop off the '63 by submerging the entire car in water to remove it. Though you have removed the blemish, you have compromised the card as a whole in the process.

Splitting hairs I guess, but I feel it is a bigger deal than just a surface removal, and either way, the card is altered in my opinion.
What would you say to do about a card that had water-based paint spilled on it? The aesthetic value is ruined. You now have 3 options: 1) throw it away 2) keep it as-is or 3) soak it in water and get back its aesthetic value. Then what about oil-based paint that would require solvent? I'm not saying there's a right or wrong, necessarily, though I think that's where most would probably (at least claim to) draw the line.

Everyone falls on a different place on the ethical spectrum for everything, so I try not to judge, but I think it's safe to say that the majority of people want the things they own (and/or are trying to sell) to be as nice and presentable as possible.
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  #186  
Old 03-02-2020, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by marcdelpercio View Post
Well, actually I would cover the car in water to clean it quite often. I mean, that's basically the definition of washing a car, right? If you were to purchase the car in my analogy, would you expect that the seller should disclose every time the car was washed in the past 60 years? Do you consider that "compromising" the car?
That's where the analogy falls apart to a certain degree. Because a car is sheet metal, covered in paint and layers of clear coat to protect against the elements, "cleaning it" is really not as intrusive as it would be if the body was made out of a substance that was not water resistant.

I get what you are saying though, but I still see it as a level of compromise when you go through the post and see how many cards cannot be soaked. They are made from paper, pressed pulp that when gets wet, can begin to degrade even if the slightest bit.

In my book, that is something that should be disclosed if the intent is to improve the appearance and value of the card. Similar to the way that comic books, when restored and graded have a different designation/value. It is done in fine arts all the time, during the restoration/cleaning processes on old pieces of art in the name of preservation. So I don't have a problem with the practice as much as I do with the venom thrown at other practices, when soaking in my book, is another tool of improving/altering cards and profiting from the result. Again, all my opinion, just wanted to hear from other folks so I do appreciate you chiming in!
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  #187  
Old 03-02-2020, 03:06 PM
yanks87 yanks87 is offline
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What would you say to do about a card that had water-based paint spilled on it? The aesthetic value is ruined. You now have 3 options: 1) throw it away 2) keep it as-is or 3) soak it in water and get back its aesthetic value. Then what about oil-based paint that would require solvent? I'm not saying there's a right or wrong, necessarily, though I think that's where most would probably (at least claim to) draw the line.

Everyone falls on a different place on the ethical spectrum for everything, so I try not to judge, but I think it's safe to say that the majority of people want the things they own (and/or are trying to sell) to be as nice and presentable as possible.
That sounds like my kind of card! I am definitely on the spectrum, or at least I have been told as such. If a card had something dropped on it, it is up to the owner what to do with it. Does that ruin the aesthetic to me, no, but to others it may. Tobacco Stains, Caramel Stains, hell kid's writing positions on cards provides more validation than any grading could ever to me, but that is to me. I would NEVER take a solvent to a card, or for that matter soak a card to remove glue, for fear what it would do to the actual card. I have a feeling I am in the minority, but there is an aura of hypocrisy that this post exists at the same time as the other post about buffing newer card surfaces to get better grades. Apples to apples in my book. But again, my opinion and thank you for the reply!
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  #188  
Old 03-02-2020, 03:47 PM
marcdelpercio marcdelpercio is offline
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Originally Posted by yanks87 View Post
That's where the analogy falls apart to a certain degree. Because a car is sheet metal, covered in paint and layers of clear coat to protect against the elements, "cleaning it" is really not as intrusive as it would be if the body was made out of a substance that was not water resistant.
That's a fair point, but I feel that the purpose of this thread is to determine what cards can be soaked WITHOUT intrusively degrading the composition. When I soak a card, my goal is to simply remove things that HAVE degraded it and were not a part of the card to begin with. That is where I draw the line with alterations. To add color or trim away a part of the card that was initially there is fundamentally changing the original integrity of the card. Soaking dirt or added paper off of it is not. It is possible pretty close to 100% of the time with enough scrutiny and technology to detect trimming/rebuilding/recoloring. It is not possible at all to detect a card that has been soaked in water. And the reason for that is because that card has NOT been altered from its original state.
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  #189  
Old 03-02-2020, 03:53 PM
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I guess when you think about, cardboard is essentially wood pounded into a slurry with water, then pressed and dried. Is temporarily reintroducing water back into it really changing it? If you wash and dry a dirty shirt, have you changed the shirt?

Now we’re back to the mind-f*cky part
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  #190  
Old 03-02-2020, 03:57 PM
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I guess when you think about, cardboard is essentially wood pounded into a slurry with water, then pressed and dried. Is temporarily reintroducing water back into it really changing it? If you wash and dry a dirty shirt, have you changed the shirt?

Now we’re back to the mind-f*cky part
EXACTLY. And yes you have changed the shirt, fibers break down during every wash, but that might be going down a rabbit hole it's best to stay out of!!
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  #191  
Old 03-02-2020, 04:02 PM
yanks87 yanks87 is offline
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Originally Posted by marcdelpercio View Post
That's a fair point, but I feel that the purpose of this thread is to determine what cards can be soaked WITHOUT intrusively degrading the composition. When I soak a card, my goal is to simply remove things that HAVE degraded it and were not a part of the card to begin with. That is where I draw the line with alterations. To add color or trim away a part of the card that was initially there is fundamentally changing the original integrity of the card. Soaking dirt or added paper off of it is not. It is possible pretty close to 100% of the time with enough scrutiny and technology to detect trimming/rebuilding/recoloring. It is not possible at all to detect a card that has been soaked in water. And the reason for that is because that card has NOT been altered from its original state.
True, but I did see a lot of W551's recently that were very obviously soaked as the inks bled all over the place, it was a mess of blue and red, great in modern art, not so good in this case. They were slabbed and sold. So I will agree, soaking is the one of the least of the nefarious things that can be done to cards, if it is nondestructive, in order to restore or preserve the original card, but in my book (very thin with a lot of pictures), it is still "meddling."
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  #192  
Old 03-05-2020, 08:07 AM
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I think going with what the hobby deems acceptable (most think soaking in water is ok) is the best way to go. I do think soaking can change composition a little bit because the few times I have done it I could tell it was done afterwards. The cards with white borders look a tiny bit less white to me. Also, I have seen cards change a shade of color too.

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Originally Posted by yanks87 View Post
True, but I did see a lot of W551's recently that were very obviously soaked as the inks bled all over the place, it was a mess of blue and red, great in modern art, not so good in this case. They were slabbed and sold. So I will agree, soaking is the one of the least of the nefarious things that can be done to cards, if it is nondestructive, in order to restore or preserve the original card, but in my book (very thin with a lot of pictures), it is still "meddling."
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  #193  
Old 03-14-2020, 07:50 PM
ahumes13 ahumes13 is offline
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Has anyone ever tried to soak an E98? I understand the general concern with the color/sheen/fragility of the cards, but curious if anyone has ever tried?
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  #194  
Old 03-14-2020, 08:04 PM
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Has anyone ever tried to soak an E98? I understand the general concern with the color/sheen/fragility of the cards, but curious if anyone has ever tried?
i wouldnt think there'd be any problem soaking an e98...they're sturdy.
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  #195  
Old 03-14-2020, 09:07 PM
ahumes13 ahumes13 is offline
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I think the (potential) issue is the color on the front can flake off generally or when encased, etc., am curious if it survives a soak.
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  #196  
Old 05-19-2020, 04:33 PM
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Soaked this M101-5 for about 10 mins in tap water. The two bits of paper were loose and slid off when i pulled the card out of the water. Was slightly nervous about harming the front so I didn't leave it long in the water. Front looks the same, back no longer has the 2 bits of scrapbook paper attached.
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  #197  
Old 05-19-2020, 08:31 PM
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Default card with autograph?

Has anyone ever tried to soak a card with scrapbook adheasive/paper stuck to the back that is normally 'soakable'.... that is also signed on the front in ballpoint pen?

Did the ballpoint pen autograph survive the soaking?

I've been tempted.
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