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  #31  
Old 09-10-2017, 01:37 PM
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mybuddyinc mybuddyinc is offline
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Some GREAT ideas here Like them all

sept3a.jpg

Fun thread !!!!! Scott
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  #32  
Old 09-10-2017, 08:25 PM
KMayUSA6060 KMayUSA6060 is offline
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Originally Posted by mybuddyinc View Post
Some GREAT ideas here Like them all

Attachment 287359

Fun thread !!!!! Scott
Gonna have to add some of these to my collection.

Keep the fun facts coming! This is, well, fun!
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  #33  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:39 PM
sreader3 sreader3 is offline
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Default Chase (Loving Cup)

Here's a link to a contemporary article about Chase (Loving Cup) for those interested:

http://www.net54baseball.com/showthr...8loving+cup%29
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  #34  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:57 PM
bbcard1 bbcard1 is offline
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Fantastic stuff. This is what I'm looking for. I will add the rest of the Chase poses and Zimmerman to my Black Sox list. Thank you!
Also add Peaches Graham (known as Billy Maharg, Graham spelled backwards) in his role in the scandal:

1919 Chicago Black Sox scandal[edit]
Maharg's third connection with major league baseball came in 1919 as he conspired to fix the 1919 World Series—the infamous Black Sox Scandal. Several White Sox players, including Eddie Cicotte, Chick Gandil, and Swede Risberg, conspired with Sleepy Bill Burns, a former big-league pitcher, to throw the World Series in exchange for $100,000. Billy Maharg worked with Burns to find financing. Maharg and Burns approached New York gambler Arnold Rothstein to raise the money for the players. Other gamblers soon entered the picture, whereupon the players, Maharg and Burns suffered multiple double-crosses. The White Sox did in fact lose the Series.

In September 1920, a disgruntled Maharg gave the full details of the plot to a Philadelphia writer. Eight White Sox players were indicted for throwing the Series. When Maharg was called as a witness in the criminal trial, someone noted, “He flashed enough diamonds on his fingers to buy a flock of autos.” Maharg was asked, “Are you a ballplayer named “Peaches Graham?” The answer was, “No! I have never been anything but Billy Maharg. I know Graham, but I am not he.” (It has long been believed that Maharg's real name was Graham, or Maharg spelled backwards.)

The Chicago jury found the eight players not guilty, and Maharg celebrated with the players afterward. All eight were subsequently banned from baseball for life by Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis.

Three of the former players implicated in the Black Sox Scandal were members of the 1912 Detroit Tigers: Sleepy Bill Burns and Jean Dubuc were both pitchers for the 1912 Tigers, and Maharg was one of the 1912 replacement Tigers.

Actor Richard Edson played the part of Maharg in John Sayles' 1988 film Eight Men Out.
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  #35  
Old 09-11-2017, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by bbcard1 View Post
Also add Peaches Graham (known as Billy Maharg, Graham spelled backwards) in his role in the scandal:

1919 Chicago Black Sox scandal[edit]
Maharg's third connection with major league baseball came in 1919 as he conspired to fix the 1919 World Series—the infamous Black Sox Scandal. Several White Sox players, including Eddie Cicotte, Chick Gandil, and Swede Risberg, conspired with Sleepy Bill Burns, a former big-league pitcher, to throw the World Series in exchange for $100,000. Billy Maharg worked with Burns to find financing. Maharg and Burns approached New York gambler Arnold Rothstein to raise the money for the players. Other gamblers soon entered the picture, whereupon the players, Maharg and Burns suffered multiple double-crosses. The White Sox did in fact lose the Series.

In September 1920, a disgruntled Maharg gave the full details of the plot to a Philadelphia writer. Eight White Sox players were indicted for throwing the Series. When Maharg was called as a witness in the criminal trial, someone noted, “He flashed enough diamonds on his fingers to buy a flock of autos.” Maharg was asked, “Are you a ballplayer named “Peaches Graham?” The answer was, “No! I have never been anything but Billy Maharg. I know Graham, but I am not he.” (It has long been believed that Maharg's real name was Graham, or Maharg spelled backwards.)

The Chicago jury found the eight players not guilty, and Maharg celebrated with the players afterward. All eight were subsequently banned from baseball for life by Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis.

Three of the former players implicated in the Black Sox Scandal were members of the 1912 Detroit Tigers: Sleepy Bill Burns and Jean Dubuc were both pitchers for the 1912 Tigers, and Maharg was one of the 1912 replacement Tigers.

Actor Richard Edson played the part of Maharg in John Sayles' 1988 film Eight Men Out.

George "Peaches" Graham and Billy Graham aka Maharg were two different people.
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  #36  
Old 09-12-2017, 12:00 AM
Chuck9788 Chuck9788 is offline
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WITHOUT A DOUBT the "CRAZIEST" player card that I own is a T-206 Larry McLean (gold border) below.




Please check out this BIO below :

McLean was the tallest catcher in major league history. Known for his heavy drinking and violent behavior, McLean's career ended after a 1915 brawl with New York Giants manager John McGraw and coach Dick Kinsella. He was fatally shot by a bartender six years after his last major league appearance.

McLean was known to chew large amounts of Brown's Mule tobacco and was a heavy drinker of corn whiskey. When he signed with the Portland Beavers of the Pacific Coast League in 1905, he became teammates with a pitcher who also struggled with alcohol use, Ned Garvin. Baseball author Dennis Snelling said that this pitcher-catcher combination formed "one of the most volatile batteries in the history of the game."

In 1906, McLean signed with Portland again for a $1400 annual salary. McLean's wife publicly voiced her objection to the salary, and she said that Portland owner William Wallace McCredie was not paying McLean consistent with his value. She said that the minor-league team in Altoona was willing to sign him for $2400 per year. McLean did play in 88 games for the 1906 Portland Beavers and he hit .355. The team won the Pacific Coast League.

A drinking incident with Cincinnati that year ended with McLean jumping in the fountain at the Buckingham Hotel, and it resulted in McLean being demoted back to the minor leagues by manager Kid Nichols. "I can pitch to Larry real good, but I can't manage him worth a dime," Nichols said.

Before the 1910 season, the Reds suspended McLean after he violated team rules during spring training at Hot Springs, Arkansas. In response to the suspension, McLean wrote a "letter of resignation" from the club. His resignation was accepted, but he was later allowed to rejoin the team with the caveats that he would play for a reduced salary and would sit out the first week of the regular season.

In August 1913, McLean was traded from the St. Louis Cardinals to the New York Giants. Chief Meyers was the Giants' primary catcher, but he was injured during the 1913 postseason, so McLean played five games in the 1913 World Series.

CAREER ENDING FIGHT

In June 1915, McLean engaged in a brawl with Giants manager John McGraw and scout Dick Kinsella. McLean had recently been suspended for ten days for failing to stay in shape. He was angry at Kinsella because he felt the scout had convinced McGraw to suspend him. McLean and several companions entered the lobby of the team's hotel and attacked Kinsella. The melee escalated and Kinsella broke a chair over McLean's head while several team members worked to subdue McLean. The catcher and his companions fled in a car. McGraw dismissed McLean from the Giants later that day. McLean never played again.


DEATH

McLean was killed on March 14, 1921 in Boston, where he was shot by the manager of a saloon. He had become unruly the night before his death and chased a bartender out of the saloon. When McLean returned on the night of March 14, he became offended when the manager refused to lend him a cigarette. The manager said that McLean was attempting to crawl over the bar, aided by his friend (and recent parolee) Jack McCarthy, when the manager fired 2 gunshots.

McLean was dead when he arrived at the hospital, while McCarthy was hospitalized with a gunshot wound to the stomach. The saloon manager, James J. Connor, was arrested on suspicion of murder and given a light sentence.


LEGACY

McLean received one vote in the 1937 Baseball Hall of Fame elections. He was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006. At 6'5", McLean holds the record as being the tallest catcher in major league history.

Last edited by Chuck9788; 09-12-2017 at 12:05 AM.
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  #37  
Old 09-12-2017, 10:43 AM
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mybuddyinc mybuddyinc is offline
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George "Peaches" Graham and Billy Graham aka Maharg were two different people.
Correct, two different people.

Peaches Graham played Baseball 1902-1912.

Billy Maharg (Graham) was a "local club boxer" 1901-1907.

He is Maharg's boxing record:

http://boxrec.com/en/boxer/125064

Officially he was 4-1-4. But if you add up all his fights he was 45-11-8. Any fight with NWS after result means "Newspaper decision." Basically some newspaper reporter would render a decision in his paper the morning after fight (mainly for the appeasement of bets). As you can see, he mainly fought in local Philadelphia Athletic Clubs.

He was pretty much a bum.
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  #38  
Old 09-12-2017, 11:46 AM
glenv glenv is offline
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Lena Blackburne - found a mud (Lena Blackburne Rubbing Mud) used to treat baseballs that continues to be used to this day.
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  #39  
Old 09-12-2017, 12:39 PM
KMayUSA6060 KMayUSA6060 is offline
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Lena Blackburne - found a mud (Lena Blackburne Rubbing Mud) used to treat baseballs that continues to be used to this day.
Boom! Added to the list.

Keep em coming!
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  #40  
Old 09-15-2017, 09:37 AM
KMayUSA6060 KMayUSA6060 is offline
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Here's one for you guys. I've had this card for a while now (actually had two at one point for some reason), but I targeted it due to a unique fact about him.

Neal Ball

From Wikipedia...

Although he was never famous for his defensive skills,[13] he achieved baseball history when he executed the first unassisted triple play in the MLB on July 19, 1909, doing so against the Boston Red Sox at League Park.[2][14][15] In the second inning of the game, Ball, playing shortstop, caught Amby McConnell's line drive, stepped on second base to retire Heinie Wagner, and then tagged outfielder Jake Stahl as he was advancing towards second.[16] Because the play was unprecedented and turned so swiftly, the ballplayers on the field did not know the inning was over and the crowd of 11,000 were unsure of how to react. Cy Young, the game's starting pitcher, was puzzled and asked Ball why he was leaving the field.[2] Once the fans in attendance realized what had happened, they gave him an ovation, while his teammates applauded him as he returned to the dugout.[2][17] In the following inning, with the crowd still cheering, he hit an inside-the-park home run into center field (the only home run he hit that season).[1][2] After the game, he was questioned in a post-game interview, a rare occurrence at the time.[12] He remained humble about the feat and reminded the reporters that "anyone could have made the play".[12] The glove that he used to make the unassisted triple play is on exhibit at the Baseball Hall of Fame.
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