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04-17-2008, 10:35 AM
Posted By: <b>Tim</b><p>I recently purchased a card that I think is a lower grade than it should have recieved. One explination I was given is that it may have a surface wrinkle that is only visible through a loupe.<br /><br />Do many of you use a loupe when examining your cards and if so what kind? I did a search and there are a lot of different ones.<br /><br />Any feedback on this is appreciated.

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04-17-2008, 10:43 AM
Posted By: <b>Neal</b><p>I use a 10x jewelers loupe. However,I have found to work even better is a giant magnified glass with light built in. Works like a charm!<br /><br />Very similar to this one!<br /><br /><a href="http://www.electronicsnmore.com/product_info.php/products_id/8451?osCsid=a957ea7ad3c585829053837749b0d3a3" target="_new" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.electronicsnmore.com/product_info.php/products_id/8451?osCsid=a957ea7ad3c585829053837749b0d3a3</a" target="_new" rel="nofollow">http://www.electronicsnmore.com/product_info.php/products_id/8451?osCsid=a957ea7ad3c585829053837749b0d3a3</a</a>>

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04-17-2008, 10:54 AM
Posted By: <b>Paul Grubor</b><p>I agree..I use an Ultra-Optix MG model #SV-3LP and its the perfect tool for examining cards. I usually wait for a sunny day and tilt the card every possible way looking for imperfections. I start with the corners and then throughly examine the edges and middle. I then check the back for hidden wrinkles and corner wear. I'm a PSA dealer and I also write down what I think the examiner will grade the card. I'm getting a tad better each year very seldom do I miss an obvious flaw such as a light surface wrinkle. Anyway, my Ultra-Optix magnifying glass works wonders but I'm not even sure if they still produce them. <br /><br />Paul

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04-17-2008, 11:01 AM
Posted By: <b>TFerg</b><p>Bausch and Lomb makes a 10X attached to a pen light(2 AA batteries req.)

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04-17-2008, 11:01 AM
Posted By: <b>Neal</b><p><a href="http://www.ultraoptix.com/Pages/Products%20Page.html" target="_new" rel="nofollow">http://www.ultraoptix.com/Pages/Products%20Page.html</a>

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04-17-2008, 11:46 AM
Posted By: <b>barrysloate</b><p>A loupe should be a part of everyone's collection. It really helps you see things you would otherwise miss, especially if you have eyesight like mine (thick glasses, bifocals, the works).

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04-17-2008, 11:51 AM
Posted By: <b>Rob D.</b><p>Barry,<br /><br />Are you suggesting a loupe over a magnifying glass? Or is using anything that simply provides magnification enough? Are there advtantages of using a loupe instead of a magnifying glass?

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04-17-2008, 12:30 PM
Posted By: <b>barrysloate</b><p>Rob- there are some high quality magnifying glasses, but they are better for enlarging a wide area. A loupe allows you to look at a smaller area more clearly and with great detail. Generally your eye is much closer to the object with a loupe.

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04-17-2008, 12:33 PM
Posted By: <b>barry arnold</b><p>i'm with my fellow dinosaur (Barry S.) on this one.<br />loupe--gotta have it.<br /><br />best,<br />barry

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04-17-2008, 12:35 PM
Posted By: <b>Aaron Patton</b><p><br /><br />...is 10x standard? Are there disadvantages to using anything over 10x?

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04-17-2008, 12:52 PM
Posted By: <b>barrysloate</b><p>I don't know what the ideal enlargement is, and it might vary based on the user's eyesight (I'm guessing). I think if you make the image too large it can be difficult to see clearly. Try a couple out; there will be one that you will like over the others.

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04-17-2008, 01:18 PM
Posted By: <b>Joe D.</b><p>get this one.....<br /><br />and walk around shows with it on. Look sternly at the dealer when you ask if you could examine the card more closely.<br /><br /><br /><a href="http://www.ariamedical.com/seiler-led.html" target="_new" rel="nofollow">http://www.ariamedical.com/seiler-led.html</a><br />

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04-17-2008, 01:58 PM
Posted By: <b>sonny</b><p>Dave's vintage cards has a couple to choose from<br /><br />https://www.gfg.com/baseball/loupe.shtml

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04-17-2008, 02:05 PM
Posted By: <b>barrysloate</b><p>Joe- I recommend that surgical loupe for splitting atoms. Gives you a good clear view of them critters.

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04-17-2008, 03:31 PM
Posted By: <b>dan mckee</b><p>If you need a loupe to see an imperfection, then there is no imperfection on that card to a collector.

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04-17-2008, 03:38 PM
Posted By: <b>Matt</b><p>dan - that depends on how bad your eyesight is <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14>

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04-17-2008, 03:47 PM
Posted By: <b>davidcycleback</b><p>I remember when I was a kid and my dad got bifoculs, because it was easier to beat him in ping pong.<br />

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04-17-2008, 08:39 PM
Posted By: <b>dan mckee</b><p>Damn Matt you got me again! That is very well put and the more I think about it, the more you are correct!!! too funny, if I am legally blind and see nothing on an obviously creased card, then I lose. STOP Bursting my bubble!!! But you do crack me up! Dan

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04-17-2008, 09:10 PM
Posted By: <b>Joann</b><p>Actually Dan, you had it right. There is no blemish on a card if it can't be seen **by a collector**. If your card looks great to you then it looks great, whether your eyesight is 20/10 or 20/200. <br /><br />Whether a defect is actually there only matters if the collector decides to trade or sell. Only now, because there is a matter of objective value in the collecting world at stake, does the individual eyesight matter and the collector needs to determine the actual condition of the card - maybe even with a loupe.<br /><br />So as long as you are in the role of (as the post said) a collector, your standard of "if I can't see it it isn't there" is exactly correct. Only when your role changes to seller or trader does eyesight come into play. <br /><br />I'm just saying. <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14><br /><br />Joann

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04-17-2008, 11:41 PM
Posted By: <b>Louis Bollman</b><p>If you are concerned with surface wrinkles it is not a loupe that tells the story. Do what the graders do. Go to any office supply store and get a cheap desk lamp with a hologen (spelling ?). View the card(s) in question in a darker room with just the desk lamp. Hold the card at different angles and if the card has a wrinkle or a faint crease it will be far more visable than with any magnification available.<br /><br />Having said this, I couldn't agree more with the others who stated that if the card looks good to you it's probably good enough. Speaking for myself, I would rather have a fresh looking T206 from the "Southern Find" that has a tiny, "factory" wrinkle than a toned example with a few corner touches that still technically (in the grading word) grades a "7".<br /><br />Louis Bollman