PDA

View Full Version : Diamond Cut Cards


Archive
03-17-2008, 04:10 PM
Posted By: <b>Addie_Joss</b><p>Is there any difference in the value or grading of diamond cut cards? I seem to notice a lot of caramels featuring the diamond cut where the top and bottom borders are cut on slants, yet they still seem to grade. I thought they would only be subjected to AUthentic grades but I've seen some pretty highly graded examples lately.

Archive
03-17-2008, 05:15 PM
Posted By: <b>fkw</b><p>A true diamond cut card is cut by the factory, and should always grade. <br />It is not an altered card. <br /><br /><br />The sheet just wasnt kept straight wen they cut the cards. Quality Control wasnt a high prority.

Archive
03-17-2008, 08:48 PM
Posted By: <b>Tim</b><p>I understand what you're saying about the cut not effecting the grade, but how does it effect market value? Do most collectors not consider it a big deal, or do people see it as a reason to devalue a card regardless of it's grading?<br /><br /><img src="http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh58/abravefan11/WalterJohnsonPortrait.jpg">

Archive
03-17-2008, 09:07 PM
Posted By: <b>peter ullman</b><p>It depends on the card. I personally don't mind diamond cut cards as long as the borders are pretty even. Some diamond cut cards with razor sharp corners and uneven borders can look trimmed to me and I don't care for them. <a href="http://s72.photobucket.com/albums/i176/ullmandds/?action=view&current=bridwelle101.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i176/ullmandds/bridwelle101.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

Archive
03-18-2008, 10:20 PM
Posted By: <b>Anonymous</b><p>This is the part of buying cards that has frustrated me to this point. And please don't take anything I say from this point forward to be hostile as I truly want to understand what it is I am looking at.<br /><br />I often read here and other places, a card is only worth what you pay for it at the point of purchase, and only what you can get for it at the point of sale. I understand that concept but we all attempt to put value on something when we enter the market place to give ourselves a reference point and get the best deal possible. I use various sites and reference points to figure out what for example various PSA grades are worth or what the current market value for that particular graded card is to give myself some idea of what is a good or bad deal within a certain grade.<br /><br />Then I read "Buy the card and not the holder." So what tools should I then use?<br /><br />If I'm using a PSA grade of 4 as search criteria, how do I then determine what a strong PSA 4 card is and what a weak PSA 4 card is if I'm "buying the card and not the holder?"<br /><br />Am I just trying to condense into a short time what should take years to learn?<br /><br />In the end I am happy with my Johnson card posted above and I though I got it at a great price, which in the end is all that's important. It does have a diamond cut, but I felt the rest of the card showed very well for the PSA 4 grade. I would love to hear what some of the more experienced collectors would have to say good or bad about that card or anything else I spoke about above as I really want to learn more about what I am doing.

Archive
03-18-2008, 10:53 PM
Posted By: <b>JimB</b><p>I believe I read somewhere that PSA determines centering at the point where the centering is the worst. <br />JimB

Archive
03-19-2008, 12:22 AM
Posted By: <b>Brian Lindholme</b><p>...you pretty much answered your own questions but I'll jump in by saying that everyone who "buys the card" will still look at features that appeal to them or bother them. This is very evident in lower grade cards simply because things that lower technical grades like minor paper loss, rounded corners or light creases may not bother buyers in the same manner.<br /><br />If your Barney portrait was diamond cut a degree or two more, it could still get a PSA grade 4, but you'll have to decide if you would want to pay the higher price that a straighter PSA4 would go for? You probably received a bit less competition for this card and realized a bit better price because of it.<br /><br />That's what the other guys are probably trying to say. Use the slab grade to get you in the ballpark of cards that fit your taste, but don't be afraid to look at some 3's or 5's because they might give you even better value (especially the 3) <br /><br />I think the range you see between sales in any grade won't soley be the high and the low ends of the grade, but it will be part of the equation.<br /><br />Look for cards that appeal to you, and you'll be fine. Don't worry about minor price differences in the grade, but if it is much higher than the median or much lower, your competition probably sees something they like or dislike (flaws, dealer feedback, shipping costs, return policy) and you can learn from that too.<br /><br />Gosh we are fortunate to have the resources we have now...this board is certainly the best of those.<br /><br />Brian L<br />familytoad<br />Ridgefield WA<br />