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05-31-2005, 08:08 PM
Posted By: <b>Anson</b><p>I'm not sure how well cards hold up in SGC or GAI holders in a fire, but I'm guessing not very well. While I'm not planning on having a major fire anytime soon, has anyone found a nice fireproof container to store their cards in?

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05-31-2005, 08:39 PM
Posted By: <b>Todd Schultz</b><p>I'd like to know as well. Also, assuming a safe could prevent combustion, would it still allow sufficent heat to melt plastic slabs/holders/sleeves and smoke to discolor the cards?<br />Inquiring minds want to know <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14>

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05-31-2005, 08:46 PM
Posted By: <b>barrysloate</b><p>The key is that a safe could theoretically get so hot that the plastic inside could melt. But that's assuming a fire were to last for a few hours, which is highly unlikely. Most fires are put out in a half hour or less, and I don't think they would get hot enough. How about the water used to put out the fire? Could that get into a safe? Often a fire is minor but the water used to extinguish it is devastating.

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05-31-2005, 09:10 PM
Posted By: <b>Anson</b><p>I know there are fireproof materials out there that could be used to make something. I remember seeing the material used for space shuttle tiles that would work nicely. At an 1/4 inch thick, you could put your hand on one side and a lit blow torch on the other safely. <br /><br />

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05-31-2005, 10:22 PM
Posted By: <b>MikeB</b><p>I recently bought a large safe. Approximately 800 lbs. The problem is that most safes are rated for 1200 degrees for 30-90 minutes. This is about the same as the small safes you can buy at Target. In a fire, the inside of the safe should not exceed 375 degrees. I was told that paper burns at 405 degrees. However I believe that the plastic cases would laminate your cards at 375. There are safes rated at much higher numbers, but they are very pricey. I have put a small safe in the large safe, hoping that the combination will keep the slabbed cards safe.<br />Mike

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05-31-2005, 10:25 PM
Posted By: <b>MikeB</b><p>Almost forgot. As Mr. Sloate stated, the water used could be a problem, but should not be if the safe is not standing in water. Most safes are not water proof, but are water resistant.<br />Mike

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05-31-2005, 11:15 PM
Posted By: <b>Brian Daniels</b><p>contrary to what has been posted thus far-you want to buy a safe with<br /><br />a) no tumblers<br />b) no levers or handles<br /><br />YES! they make these as they are better resistant to both water,heat (not temperature)but how long it will take to heat up inside.<br />and of course entry deterent by burglars and your dachshund! I'll find the company that makes them later~

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05-31-2005, 11:36 PM
Posted By: <b>Anonymous</b><p><img src="http://www.network54.com/Realm/tmp/1117596978.JPG">

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06-01-2005, 08:55 AM
Posted By: <b>warshawlaw</b><p>1. Rent a good sized safe deposit box (or several at different locations) and store a chunk of your collection there. That way if there is a fire at your house, you aren't completely SOL. I store the "heart" of my collection at the bank where it is safe from any calamity to befall my home. <br /><br />2. Consider placing the safe into the ground. In many houses you could place the safe into concrete and dirt, which would cool it considerably. <br /><br />3. Insure to value. The insurance is relatively cheap and if something happens boy will it come in handy.

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06-01-2005, 01:29 PM
Posted By: <b>Darren J Duet</b><p>I use a gun safe that I purchased from Academy Sports, it's both fireproof and water resistant.

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06-01-2005, 01:30 PM
Posted By: <b>tbob</b><p>I followed all 3 of your ideas a year ago and am glad I did. Gives some peace of mind...

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09-14-2006, 01:58 PM
Posted By: <b>Cobby33</b><p>If our cards are in tombs (graded) or plastic screwdowns, is the need to de-moisturize the safe as critical as if the cards are "bare?" Just curious- thanks!

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09-14-2006, 02:18 PM
Posted By: <b>Jason</b><p>just don't store your collection in your garage!<br />growing up, my family's garage caught fire from a downed electric pole during a storm...took 15 minutes to put it out, but it was 1400 degrees inside according to the firefighters, who managed to put it out before it got to the car fuel tanks<br />So it sounds like:<br />1) most valuable at the bank<br />2) home storage should be buried in the ground, water-and heat-resitant if possible, no tumblers or levers, and nowhere near the garage<br />3) insure everything (but with who?)<br /><br />yikes, this is all scary enough to scare me back to collecting just my 1983 Topps!

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09-14-2006, 03:15 PM
Posted By: <b>Josh K.</b><p>I have decided to glue space shuttle tiles on each side of my slabs to fireproof my cards. Since I can no longer view my cards, Ive hand sketched the picture on each tile. <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14>

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09-14-2006, 03:32 PM
Posted By: <b>Jason</b><p>in getting them to stay on, please get in touch with NASA and teach them the proper technique!!!<br /><br />Personally, I am just printing color pictures of all the gorgeous cards I see posted on this site, and then propping up the paper in a display case in my study - I'm saving millions of dollars and I have the best collection here! And if the house burns down, then I can just print them again. My wife thinks it's dumb, but I don't care!<br />

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09-14-2006, 06:40 PM
Posted By: <b>jay behrens</b><p>Paper burns at 451 degrees. All reason I remember this is becuase of the book, Farenhiet 451 <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14><br /><br />Jay<br><br>I love pinatas. You get to beat the crap of something and get rewarded with candy.

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09-15-2006, 12:29 AM
Posted By: <b>Cobby33</b><p>If cards are stored as graded or in screwdowns, is the need to keep the safe dry (via use of dessicants), as important as nekkid cards being stored?

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09-15-2006, 01:11 AM
Posted By: <b>Zach S.</b><p>FYI... dessicant is used to REMOVE moisture. You cannot add moisture to the air using dessicant.<br /><br />Zach S.<br />zsmith@as39.navy.mil