PDA

View Full Version : How about toluene for ink/pencil marks on cards?


Archive
08-29-2006, 11:52 AM
Posted By: <b>Brian McQueen</b><p><br />Read the article just now on removing tape adhesive from cards with toluene. If this method works on adhesive/stains, would it be effective at all with ink/pencil marks? <br /><br />Or, if not, has anyone found a method for removing writing from cards yet? You know, besides taking an eraser to the surface? Thanks all,<br /><br />Brian

Archive
08-29-2006, 12:31 PM
Posted By: <b>E. Angyal</b><p>Others may want to interject what they know here.<br /><br />Eric

Archive
08-29-2006, 12:33 PM
Posted By: <b>david</b><p>well, it is better then benzene (a little chemistry humor). <br />i would avoid using organic solvents. ethanol should work just as well and shouldnt take off the ink of the card. maybe 10-20% ethanol should be sufficient. pencil would only come off with an eraser

Archive
08-29-2006, 12:36 PM
Posted By: <b>davidcycleback</b><p>Defeinitely avoid using toluene to remove the tape adhesive from your lab rats. It's better to give them a shampoo bath followed by a light brushing.

Archive
08-29-2006, 02:14 PM
Posted By: <b>Bob S</b><p>While the biohazards of industrial solvents was not my main educational/employment focus (Physics and Philosophy were my twin crosses to bear LOL..., I do know that toluene is one of the more benign of the largly benzene ring based chemicals.<br /><br />Benzene, as was already mentioned, and especially CCL4 (Carbon Tet.) would be several orders of magnitude more dangerous to work with without a proper vent exhaust.<br /><br />And it's way out of my league to speculate on the more sophisticated solvents developed in the last 30-40 years.<br /><br />Before using any of these products it would be best to contact a local Health dept. or university chemistry dept. first.<br /><br />I want all our members to live as long as possible.<br /><br />Regards.<br /><br />Bob<br /><br />returnaddress

Archive
08-29-2006, 11:34 PM
Posted By: <b>Gilbert Maines</b><p>Bob, with all respect which is certainly due, I feel that it is irresponsible to tell our colleagues that a chemical is relatively benign unless you know that to be true.<br /><br />Although I am no toxicologist, I liken a comparison between benzene and toluene as stating that it is better to be 30' from ground zero in a nuclear explosion than it is to be 25' from ground zero.<br /><br />Toluene, aka Methylbenzene:<br />Health Hazard Reference(s) <br />Recognized: Developmental Toxicant P65 <br />Suspected: Cardiovascular or Blood Toxicant KLAA RTECS <br /> Gastrointestinal or Liver Toxicant RTECS <br /> Immunotoxicant IPCS <br /> Kidney Toxicant KLAA RTECS STAC <br /> Neurotoxicant ATSDR DAN EPA-HEN FELD HAZMAP OEHHA-AREL OEHHA-CREL RTECS <br /> Reproductive Toxicant EPA-SARA FRAZIER <br /> Respiratory Toxicant EPA-HEN LU OEHHA-AREL OEHHA-CREL <br /> Skin or Sense Organ Toxicant EPA-HEN OEHHA-AREL <br />

Archive
08-30-2006, 07:57 AM
Posted By: <b>ErlandStevens</b><p>I don't want to belittle safety or taking precautions when working with chemicals (or hijack Brian's thread on cleaning cards), but solvents like toluene and even benzene are not very dangerous. As long as you don't work with benzene ten hours/day in a small closet with the card two inches from your face, then your exposure problems will be negligible. As long as you take reasonable measures to limit your exposure, then the risk is no greater than pumping your own gas or filling up your mower. Gasoline contains small amounts of both benzene and toluene.<br><br>By the way, benzene used to be the solvent of choice for washing one's hands in lab. It was found to be a carcinogen so people quit doing it. Exposure on your skin is not a problem because it doesn't pass through your skin. Breathing its vapors does lead to risk over *very* long term exposure. The problem is that your body has a hard time metabolizing it, so benzene builds in your tissues.<br><br>To keep this on topic (somewhat), I agree that toluene won't touch the pencil marks.

Archive
08-30-2006, 08:22 AM
Posted By: <b>David Vargha</b><p><font color=blue>Toluene does work to remove tape, but it does require some effort to remove the remaining residue (adhesive). A 10-20% solution of ethanol, poured in a glass and mixed with Coke also makes the process more enjoyable.</font><br><br>DavidVargha@hotmail.com

Archive
08-30-2006, 08:59 AM
Posted By: <b>Jason</b><p>I feel that if one uses good ole fashion kerosine and gently rub it with a matchstick then you get your best results.

Archive
08-30-2006, 09:01 AM
Posted By: <b>Jason</b><p>P.S. <br /><br />You may wanna wear gloves.<br /><br />Jason

Archive
08-30-2006, 05:57 PM
Posted By: <b>Bob S</b><p>That's why, with my non professional standing in the field, I recommended contacting the local Heath Dept. or a nearby University Chem Dept.<br /><br />Thanks for the heads up.<br /><br />Bob<br><br>returnaddress

Archive
08-30-2006, 06:02 PM
Posted By: <b>Rhett Yeakley</b><p>toluene is pretty benign... until 3 nitro-groups are added to it... <br />trinitrotoluene (TNT)<br /><br />-Rhett

Archive
08-30-2006, 06:14 PM
Posted By: <b>Gilbert Maines</b><p>David, I prefer your formulation, but in this instance it may not be required, for toluene is why some people sniff glue.

Archive
08-30-2006, 06:20 PM
Posted By: <b>Bob S</b><p><img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14><br /><br />Bob<br><br>returnaddress