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03-09-2005, 12:52 PM
Posted By: <b>Robert</b><p>I just recieved a second chance offer for 2 lots I lost out on the other day. A T206 Bender PSA 8 which I was the next highest bidder and a 33 Goudey Ruth PSA 6 that I came in about 4th. The respond to emails are havex@juno.com for both and they where different sellers. I just want to make the board aware of this guy and I did report it to EBAY. But knowing them nothing will happen. The message came to me as a subject "Question from ebay member" so it is someone with an account in the ebay system.<br /><br />RObert

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03-09-2005, 01:29 PM
Posted By: <b>Glenn</b><p>I got one a few days ago for an auction on which I had been the 7th (yes, 7th) highest bidder. And it was only two days after the auction ended. It was presented as a form letter through the ebay 2nd chance offer system, but the word "through" was misspelled. I should also point out that my max bid was below $1000 on a card that went for over $1500. What are these people thinking? The email came from aw-confirm@ebay.com, but I was told to contact fraieri_de_fraieri@yahoo.com if I was interested in purchasing the item at my high bid. Has anyone else received bogus second chance offers from this person?

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03-09-2005, 01:40 PM
Posted By: <b>Hal Lewis</b><p>Get this:<br /><br />I just got the same message in regards to the 1916 Harry Heilmann rookie card auction that I lost the other day!!<br /><br />I know for a FACT that Rooky13 bought the card and closed the deal...<br /><br />but the scammer's message says that the buyer did not finalize the sale and therefore I am getting a chance to buy the item for my last bid.<br /><br />I sure WISH this was true...<br /><br />but I sure hope they BUST this scammer.<br /><br /><img src="/images/sad.gif" height=14 width=14>

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03-09-2005, 01:45 PM
Posted By: <b>jay behrens</b><p>If I understand how the second chance offer works, you would pay the amount that would have been the next bid increment about the bidder below you, not your max bid.<br /><br />This is an old scam where sellers would use a fake account to win the auction, then send an offer to the underbidder, telling them that they could purchase the item for their max bid. I got these offers a lot and would also offer to pay the enxt bid incriment, never my max. Not that I would send this current scam artist anything.<br /><br />Jay<br><br>I've just reached Upper Lower Class. I am now officially a babe magnet for poor chicks.

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03-09-2005, 03:20 PM
Posted By: <b>Mark</b><p>"This is an old scam where sellers would use a fake account to win the auction, then send an offer to the underbidder, telling them that they could purchase the item for their max bid."<br /><br />Jay, it's even less sophsticated than being the highest bidder with a fake account..at least then, the scammer presumably sends the card. It's as simple as emailing anyone and everyone who bid on an expensive card through the "contact a member" feature and then offering them teh card for their high bid or whatever they want to send pay. Some people are so excited to get a second chance offer that they don't question whether the offeror is really the seller. If the scammer sends 60 emails per hour and just 1 in 10 recipients sends him $2500, that's $15k per hour (does Shaq even make that?).

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03-09-2005, 03:36 PM
Posted By: <b>wesley</b><p>It might be a little more sophisticated than that. I received a similar second chance offer not long ago. The email looked legit and there was a link to a website that looked a lot like ebay's sign on page. Just like the ebay sign on page, this one asks for user ID and password. When I enter my user name and ID, it took me to a page that looked a lot like ebay's message to member page. After I typed my message, there was a confirmation page that looked a lot like ebay's confirmation page.<br /><br />Everything looked legit, but it wasn't. I finally figured out it was a scam and I did not send any money. The thing I was most concerned about, however, was that the scammer now had my ebay ID and password. With that info, they also had access to my contact information and account information. It was a lot of trouble to change all my passwords and cancel all accounts associated with my eaby name, but I felt that I needed to do everything I could to protect myself.

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03-09-2005, 03:47 PM
Posted By: <b>davidcycleback</b><p>One thing I do is when I go to a website like eBay that requires my id and password, I start by typing in my id the wrong pass word. I feel okay when the website reposnds, "This information is incorrect. The id and password do not match the id and password on our records. Recheck your information and try again." ... If and when a site responds, "Thank you for your password. We'll get back to you," I'll be glad I typed in an incorrect password.

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03-10-2005, 05:49 PM
Posted By: <b>Dave Williams</b><p>I get about once a week a bogus message, allegedly from Pay Pal, saying I have won an auction for $300 or $400, I don't recall the exact amount.<br /><br />It says if you didn't win this item, click here.<br /><br />It takes you to an almost exact replica of a Pay Pal screen, asks for your Pay Pal ID.<br /><br />It's a scam, trying to get your Pay Pal ID.<br /><br />Like the last post said, no matter what you put in there, it takes it, and advances you.<br /><br />There is another fake e mail again, where it says Pay Pal is responding to my change of address.<br /><br />I've closed my Pay Pal account as a result. I don't need the aggravation.

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03-10-2005, 06:15 PM
Posted By: <b>Julie</b><p>an ebay page (or your feedback page)--in other words, sent with ebay's help, from someone who doesn't know your e-mail addrss, no matter how straightforward or necessary<br />it is, ebay attaches an automated message, including a warning against "second chance offers" that accompanies the e-mail. So it must be a pretty widespread thing.

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03-10-2005, 06:37 PM
Posted By: <b>ms4epg1</b><p>No, I don't think Shaq makes that much. But I think Kevin Garnett does.

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03-10-2005, 09:44 PM
Posted By: <b>Glenn</b><p>One of the most successful of these scams was by the people who operated www.paypa1.com (that's www.p-a-y-p-a-one.com, linked in their emails).