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View Full Version : original goudeys versus reprints


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02-03-2004, 04:49 AM
Posted By: <b>steve</b><p>What are the best ways to distinguish real Goudeys from reprints? Especially when you see a nice Goudey on ebay. I am very familiar with cards of the 1960's on up but not familiar with pre-WW2 cards. I see some of the listed Goudey reprints on ebay and they look astonishingly genuine. I'm afraid to bid on the ebay higher grade Goudeys listed as originals in fear that they could actually be reprints. Any guidelines about this would be most appreciated. Thank you!

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02-03-2004, 12:24 PM
Posted By: <b>nickinvegas</b><p>There are more than a dozen Goudey issues, Which year are you asking about?<BR><BR>Nick

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02-03-2004, 01:05 PM
Posted By: <b>John Wojak</b><p>If you are talking about '33 Goudeys, the most common things to look for (and there are several different kinds of reprints, so not all reprints have all the same faults) are borders that are too wide and/or too white (not the typical Goudey "cream" color), backs that are black and not green, backs that have a scuff mark on the lower portion where the word "reprint" appeared (study some undoctored reprints to see where the word "reprint" appears, then you will know exactly where to look on questionable cards), a fuzziness or lack of crisp detail compared to known originals (especially noticeable on areas like faces), colors that seem too dark and muddy compared to known originals (especially noticeable on darker colors, like brown bats or shoes, that still show some detail within the dark area on originals but are more like solid dark blobs on reprints). Hope this helps.

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02-03-2004, 01:53 PM
Posted By: <b>Hankron</b><p>I will add beware of real looking 1933-5 Goudeys with crooked cuts, and ones that appear to be paper thin. The later is often noticeable by wavyness to the edges that wouldn't apear on a regular Goudey due to it's rather hefty stock ... Never buy an ungraded Ruth or Gehrig from someone you don't know or who has a solid reputation ... Bypass sellers who use tricky language ('Looks real, but I'm not an expert' ... 'Being sold as reprint.') ... Make sure the seller is unequivical that the card is authentic (i.e. 'Guaranteed authentic') ... Make sure the seller is clear about his guarantee of authenticity. If he doesn't have it the description, email and ask him to tell what is the return policy .... In general, the seller's language about authenticity, the confidence, accuracy and nature in which they describe the item and their return policy tells me much about both the seller and the confidence he has in the product he is selling. <BR>

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02-03-2004, 01:57 PM
Posted By: <b>Hankron</b><p>Used some tricky languange myself. Luckily I don't have any Goudey's for sale, so you're safe.<BR><BR>

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02-03-2004, 04:41 PM
Posted By: <b>steve</b><p>Thanks to everyone for a quick and informative reply. I just "discovered" this forum and it is terrific - very, very enjoyable!! I plan on looking in on a regular basis and contributing when possible.<BR><BR>My main interest right now is in the 1933 Goudeys. Probably will expand my interest to the other Goudeys later. What a beautiful set of cards. I will heed the advice given here. Anyone with anything further to add would be most appreciated. Thanks again!!!

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02-03-2004, 08:08 PM
Posted By: <b>slacks</b><p>Yeah, this forum rocks with good info.<BR><BR>You might increase your knowledge by spending some time in the forum archives, see who has been posting for a long time, get a feel for how others perceive their level of expertise, and then buy something from one of these regulars in the B/S/T section or by following their link to an eBay auction. <BR><BR>Buying a few low grade raw cards you're sure are authentic and then spending a lot of hands-on time with the cards is a good way to wire yourself to become familar with how a genuine card from a particular series feels.<BR><BR>I used to work at a bank and there was a gal whose hands were better than the counterfeit detection machines - after handling money for 20 years, she knew immediately if something didn't feel right.<BR><BR>Speaking personally, sometimes late a night, I play with my cards by putting cards on a litttle make-believe field on my desk and moving them around the basepaths....okay I'm going to stop there, but you know what I mean.<BR><BR>slacks<BR>may have gone too far there<BR>

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02-03-2004, 10:11 PM
Posted By: <b>steve</b><p>Thanks Slacks! - Those are great suggestions - I will do that.<BR><BR>PS: You've only gone too far if the players on the cards start talking to you. LOL

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02-03-2004, 11:09 PM
Posted By: <b>Elliot</b><p>I've yet to see a reprint with "bleed-thru" on the reverse. On reprints the red banner on the bottom lines up perfectly with the edge of the picture---on some originals this is also the case. Some original cards have ink that continues on into the border, on the reprints there is a sudden jarring stop of ink. You need to familiarize yourself with the individual card to make use of this detection method. On most reprints the color is off-somewhat. Some of the reprints have perforation marks on the edges. Look for even wear, as the crooks seem to have a tough time duplicating it. <BR><BR>The best advice, is to look at lots of them, both in person and over the net. Buy a few reprints (as reprints) as this will help you identify them when they are being passed off as real.