PDA

View Full Version : Crap...gotta do something for a post


Archive
09-14-2001, 10:25 PM
Posted By: <b>leon</b><p>Well, here I go extemporaneously (hope I spelled that correctly) or "right off the top of the head" for those that didn't remember 1 word like that from their schoolin' days. thinking....thinking....ok here's one.....let's here from everyone (who wants to) about 1 short story of a card you encountered....not necessarily bought but at least encountered. Here's mine.....if ya'll remember I got pissed for about 36 hours at "the board" a month or two ago.....it was some of those false accusations etc.....during that time (and I even told BCD this)I figured I would go back to an antique store to look at a couple of beat up old judges (and I mean a couple) as I was bored. So I, with family in tow, strut into the antique store. I go over over a few rows from the entrance and there they were; exactly (2) t206's of which I had not looked at the backs of. Could one be a Drum or Uzit etc..? They were locked in a case. I went over to the back counter, at the back of the store, where there was a lady at the register...I told her that I wanted to see case number 55 which is where they were. A very nice, older (70ish) man came over to get a key and show me to the case. It was case #55. You would have had to see this gentleman. He was just(sic) the sweetest little ole guy who was obviously enjoying the crap out of retirement. He proceeded to telling me how this person that had these cards in the case was a big time dealer and knew everything about cards. I said "great". (I seem to be saying that a lot nowadays) I was really getting my inquisitiveness ? up now as this dealer was a serious collector or dealer or something. We got to the case(it was case #55) and I looked at the first card. It would grade an SGC 10. Common player and ............Piedmont back...with the, WRITTEN IN PENCIIL, RIGHT ON THE CARD, the insciption "case#55" The second card was the exact same way. Man did this guy really know what he was doing. He knew exactly how to label them <img src="/images/sad.gif" height=14 width=14> sorry so long.....best regards

Archive
09-14-2001, 10:33 PM
Posted By: <b>leon</b><p>I used the wrong word "here" instead of "hear" and I should have said "20th Century tobacco cards" instead of Old Judges ... both at the first of the story....moral of this post is proofread what you write BEFORE posting ....best regards

Archive
09-14-2001, 11:54 PM
Posted By: <b>john</b><p>this is a story about a card i didnt buy but wanted to...when i was a kid i always wanted a real old card,i had a book with pictures of old judge and t206 cards but i had never seen one in person, i went to a deli by my house one day where a guy had a small display case in the back where he rented out space and sold cards,and i always looked in there and he usually had cards from 50's-70's,well this day i noticed a t206 card(tannehill,cant remember which one though) and the card was only $11 !! ...one problem,the guy who sold the cards wasnt there,left for the day,next day i rode my bike down to the store with $11,and when i got there the card was gone! needless to say i was heartbroken....i did finally get my first vintage card about 2 years later up in cooperstown (bresnahan ,portrait,good condition)so the story has a happy ending

Archive
09-15-2001, 03:04 PM
Posted By: <b>Julie Vognar</b><p>I tried to fictionalize this as a story, but it was too much trouble, and never came out right, and I didn't know how to end it. SO: A man with whom I shared some interests and I were chatting one day from opposite sends of the country, and I responded to his hobby question that I collected baseball cards. He said he thought his wife had some she didn't want. She got on the phone, I started talking money, and she said "I never want to see them again in my life." Said she picked them up at a flea market. A month later, the '69 and '70 Topps, un-picked over, arrived. I thanked them profusely. Three months later, I found out that in 1971, the couple's son had committed suicide so he didn't have to fight in Vietnam. I could go on, but that's the bare bones....

Archive
03-27-2003, 07:19 PM
Posted By: <b>Lee Behrens</b><p>I wanted to revive an old thread and thought this one was cool.<BR><BR>I definately don't have astory to revival Leon's but I do have a couple of T202 with the catalog designation number on them, always did want to thank the person it makes sorting so much easier. <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14>

Archive
03-28-2003, 02:10 AM
Posted By: <b>jay behrens</b><p>I have been blessed to meet the right people everywhere I have lived in this great country and seen many incredible things in the hobby. 2 off the top of my head;<BR><BR>When I first moved to Sacramento, I was approached by a lady who had a a signed photo of Kid Nichols in street clothes. She said that her great grandmother dated him when he lived in Kansas City and played ball there. The back of the cabinet sized photo (about the size of a t3, maybe larger) had a beautiful inscription speaking about how much he loved her.<BR><BR>The lady was planning to sell it to me, but not sure if she had second thoughts about parting with family history, but I never heard from her again and did make a substantial offer for it.<BR><BR>The other stunning thing I've seen was going to a elderly gentaleman's place to see all the unopened packs he had from the 1930s. He actually had the boxes that went with most of them. Among the various packs were Delongs, Diamond Stars, Goudeys, Sports Kings (you could see a Diedrickson and Hubbel among other cards thru the wrappers) Tattoo Orbits and other cards I am forgetting. Absolutely amazing to see the amount of unopened material from the 1930s in one place. And he claimed to have had them since he was a kid. Man, no way I could have left any pack of cards unopened.<BR><BR>Jay

Archive
03-28-2003, 06:55 AM
Posted By: <b>Marc S.</b><p>Whatever happened to those packs? Did you make an offer on any?<BR><BR>There are many packs from the 1930s that I can say that I have never even seen or heard of in the unopened form. DeLongs being a good example. (one of my all-time favorite sets, to boot!)

Archive
03-28-2003, 01:08 PM
Posted By: <b>jay behrens</b><p>no, I didn't make an offer on the packs as I was a guest of another dealer. He said that when the gentleman passed away that he would be handling the sale of his sports memorablia. I hae no idea if this gentle is still alive or not.<BR><BR>Jay

Archive
03-28-2003, 01:43 PM
Posted By: <b>warshawlaw</b><p>I went to an antique store near my office (a real hole in the wall type place). The owner is ancient and he has so much stuff buried in there that you never quite know what will come bubbling up. <BR><BR>On a lark I asked about baseball cards. He brought out an ancient, dirty binder (good sign) and handed it to me. There were dozens of pages of all types of 19th century cards...or there were. Not one card was left in the binder, out of hundreds! The dust on the binder was so thick that it must have sat there for years. <BR><BR>Just a little too late. <BR><BR>My all time favorite story is this one:<BR><BR>When I was a kid in the early 1970's and just starting with vintage materials, my parents got friendly with a couple who owned an antique store in NYC and who were always going down the eastern seaboard (we lived in NYC) on buying excursions. When they found out I collected cards they offered to bring back a group of tobacco cards that a dealer acquaintance of theirs had shown them on their most recent trip to Virginia. They went down to VA again a week later, but the cards were already gone. The dealer told them that unknown to him, one of the cards was really valuable (several hundred dollars) because this old time shortstop did not want his image on a tobacco card and it had been pulled. A collector bought the whole lot from him the week before my parents' friends got there. <BR><BR>And that, my friends, is how I came within a hair of owning a T206 Wagner. For free.