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View Full Version : Assessing the Value of a Potential One of a Kind Item


CharleyBrown
05-27-2012, 08:59 AM
Curious as to how you guys assess the value of a one-of-a-kind item.

I've been watching a signed Jackie Robinson card for the last month - the card signed is not his rarest, but it is from the Bond Bread set, which in and of itself is very tough.

Seller was asking $4,500 - way too much imo. I'd like to make a counteroffer, but I don't know if I'm educated enough at this point with the auto industry to not shoot myself in the foot.

So the question must be asked as to - Does rarity of the item signed impact the overall value of the autographed item? If so, how much does it impact its value?

Thanks for your help!

Shaun

travrosty
05-27-2012, 10:06 AM
Curious as to how you guys assess the value of a one-of-a-kind item.

I've been watching a signed Jackie Robinson card for the last month - the card signed is not his rarest, but it is from the Bond Bread set, which in and of itself is very tough.

Seller was asking $4,500 - way too much imo. I'd like to make a counteroffer, but I don't know if I'm educated enough at this point with the auto industry to not shoot myself in the foot.

So the question must be asked as to - Does rarity of the item signed impact the overall value of the autographed item? If so, how much does it impact its value?

Thanks for your help!

Shaun


here is how things like this work.

The signed item won't be worth less than a signature of jackie robinson obviously. The question is, how does the rarity of the item being signed affect the price of the signed item.

The answer is that if it is a one of a kind with no past sales to look at as a guide, it is worth what a buyer is willing to pay. If you think it is worth 1000, and not any more than that, then that is what you should offer. Don't feel like it is an insult or that you are uneducated about it. If he feels insulted, that's his problem, especially if you kindly give him your offer. If you are certain he will reject your highest offer, it is best probably to move on and not make an offer.

Autographs are always worth what someone is willing to pay. Sometimes the seller and buyer can't agree on what price should be the selling/buying price.

I have a boxing autograph that is a one of a kind. I don't know anyone out there that has another example. It is not a famous boxer, but someone who fought Joe Frazier for the title. I know it is not worth a mint, but to me it is worth 300 dollars, but due to low demand for this autograph, no one has ever bid on it at that price. They probably wouldn't bid 200 for it. It would probably go for less than one hundred, but it's worth more than that to me.

Just because the guy wants 4500, doesn't make you uneducated or naive or anything like that if you want to pay less for it. You might not get it, but his "high price" doesn't make you a loser, and doesn't make him a loser either. Make an offer on the item what feel you want to pay, and if he doesn't want to go that low, then no it's no insult either way. If he feels insulted, then that's his problem, as some people get insulted easily and so that's life.

Usually a card loses its value as a card when someone signs it, so if it is a one of a kind, it's sometimes tough to gauge value, because you aren't gauging value stricly on the card, and not stricly on the autograph, but a combination. It's basically supply and demand. If there are a number of robinson collectors who collect signed cards of his, and this card fills a major hole in their collection, then the price will probably go up, but if not, the price is more flexible.

If he put it at auction with a starting price of 99 cents, would it go to 4500 dollars? Who knows, maybe or maybe not, but if you think maybe not is more likely, then it's probably overpriced to you and to others too, but if it is worth a minimum of 4.5 grand to him no matter what anyone else is ever willing to pay, he might have it for a long long time, and some people are okay with that. Just give him an offer at the most you are willing to part with and leave it at that.

There really is no shooting yourself in the foot if all he can say is 'no'.

Scott Garner
05-27-2012, 10:13 AM
Good post, Travis!

Adding my 2 cents here, I would offer the guy the value of a nice Jackie autograph, plus a small premium. Chances are if the guy really wants to sell the item, he will counteroffer your offer. At this point you can determine if the seller is reality based in his pricing. I noted what you collect from the bottom of your post. Obviously this would be a great pickup for your personal collection.

Good luck! I hope you land it.

CharleyBrown
05-29-2012, 05:04 AM
Travis and Scott,

Thanks for your replies! I sent an offer so we'll see how it goes.

-
Shaun

mr2686
05-29-2012, 09:04 AM
I agree with what's already been said. The big problem is that he may not REALLY want to sell it but would if the price was right...hence the 4500 price tag. In reality, I don't think most people would want to go over the 1500 - 1800 price range...and that's with adding some padding for it's "one of a kind" nature. I'd purchase a bond bread card and a Robinson sig seperately and have enough change to take a vacation. :D

3and2
05-29-2012, 07:13 PM
My primary focus growing up was team signed 1969 and 1986 Mets. Over the years both groups have done many reunion signings and the value has declined :(. However, I really cherish these items, therefore, the value doesn't mean a thing.