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benderbroeth
08-01-2011, 10:42 PM
i am currently reading DROOD by dan simmons, great book!!!

Ease
08-02-2011, 07:26 PM
"The Match" by Mark Frost. Sorry Feinstein, but Frost is the best golf book author imo.

Doug
08-02-2011, 09:12 PM
It's not a sports book, but I'm reading the Tao Te Ching. I'm kind of like the most interesting man in the world from the Dos Equis commercials when it comes to books. I don't always read books, but when I do I read something off the beaten path... :D

tiger8mush
08-02-2011, 10:44 PM
Book before last was "Survival in the Killing Fields", based on the Cambodian massacres of the 1970s. GREAT book.

Just finished Rex Ryan's (NY Football Jets head coach) "Play Like You Mean It". Good, but not great, book.

About to read Orwell's "1984".

And considering getting "Catch-22", which I've heard great things about.

I don't read much, but realize I probably should read more often before my mind turns to total mush :)

thescooper
08-02-2011, 11:08 PM
the Dark tower series by Stephen King

canjond
08-02-2011, 11:43 PM
New Bourne book... The Bourne Dominion

teetwoohsix
08-03-2011, 04:29 AM
"American Conspiracies" by Jesse Ventura, am in the last chapter now.

I've got to say, this book is an "eye opener" to say the least. :mad:

I've also been reading through the Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles 2010 price guide, there's a lot of cool items in there and it's pretty fun to learn about antiques.

BradH
08-04-2011, 09:52 AM
Just started reading a book that's been out a while (2003 I think?), but that I had previously missed somehow. It's called "Rothstein" by David Pietrusza.

I'm guessing a lot of board members have already read it, but it's about the life of Arnold Rothstein, the mastermind behind the 1919 World Series fix. Outstanding book so far.

bbcard1
08-04-2011, 10:05 AM
I read Hardball on vacation... Darn good read. I once coached an inner city league so it was extra special for me.

jg8422
08-04-2011, 08:09 PM
The Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell. It's the story of SEAL Team 10 in Afghanistan. Maybe the best book I ever read. Marcus is the baddest man on the planet. Will never look at the Navy SEALS the same again after this book.

judsonhamlin
08-04-2011, 08:31 PM
Just started reading a book that's been out a while (2003 I think?), but that I had previously missed somehow. It's called "Rothstein" by David Pietrusza.

I'm guessing a lot of board members have already read it, but it's about the life of Arnold Rothstein, the mastermind behind the 1919 World Series fix. Outstanding book so far.

pietrusza is a fantastic writer. He has written two great books on presidential elections - 1960 and 1920: The Year of Five Presidents. Both are worth the time.
I just read a few good books on vacation: Badasses (about the Raiders), House of Bilqis (novel set in Pakistan), Project Azorian (about the Glomar Explorer and the attempt to raise a Soviet sub); and Wrestling with Moses (about Jane Jacobs and her fight to save lower Manhattan from developments planned by Robert Moses). All are recommended

drc
08-05-2011, 01:48 AM
Last two books I read were Our Lady of the Flowers by Jean Genet and The Room by Hubert Selby Jr.

Our Lady of the Flowers was written by a man serving a life sentence in solitary cell in France, and the book is dreamlike/nightmare-like and very subversive. The prose is uniquely dreamlike and beautiful. It makes no difference to me, but I will note that the book is very homosexual.

The Room was written by Selby (Last Exit to Brooklyn, Requiem for a Dream) who is often ranked as the most disturbing serious writer of fiction, and this book, though profound and sad, is often ranked as the most disturbing book ever written. Selby said he couldn't read the book for 20 years after he wrote it. Comparable to Our Lady of the Flowers, the book is the first person narration of a petty criminal waiting in a cell before his trial. The criminal is deluded, pathetic, unreliable in what he says, broken and truly sick as he talks about his past and fantasizes about those who he perceives have wrong him. Its a fascinating and serious psychological book for the few who can stomach it. Most people who read the reviews for the book are scared to even touch it, though I didn't find it that bad.

An interesting thing about Selby, a Brooklyn heroine addict, is he was a devout Christian, and considered his books to be religious stories. It's just that his books were about the wretches and broken people of 'the other side' of New York City. Many who had read his books were surprised when the met him that he was such a nice, friendly guy. Also counterintuitively, he loved and raised songbirds and you'll find photos showing him with a bird on his shoulder.

benderbroeth
08-05-2011, 04:02 PM
the Dark tower series by Stephen King


PERHAPS THE GREATEST SERIES EVER WRITTEN!!!, are you enjoying it?

Beatles Guy
08-05-2011, 04:21 PM
"Hitter" a biography of Ted Williams by Ed Linn. Just about done and it's been great.

BradH
08-05-2011, 08:45 PM
The Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell. It's the story of SEAL Team 10 in Afghanistan. Maybe the best book I ever read. Marcus is the baddest man on the planet. Will never look at the Navy SEALS the same again after this book.


I've been fortunate to be at a couple of events with Luttrell. He's a remarkable person and a huge baseball fan. Amazing book - I have no idea how or why this has not been made into a movie. It will be eventually I'm sure.

jg8422
08-06-2011, 06:26 PM
I've been fortunate to be at a couple of events with Luttrell. He's a remarkable person and a huge baseball fan. Amazing book - I have no idea how or why this has not been made into a movie. It will be eventually I'm sure.

Marcus is an amazing person. As big as an American hero as they come. Nothing like a 6'5'' Texan who takes no shit. I did see that his story is being made into a movie.

darrend505
08-06-2011, 10:14 PM
Reading "The Hoosier Schoolmaster"

"The History of Witches"

"Death of a Colonial"

All fictional, I think that is all of them right now.

thescooper
08-08-2011, 11:49 PM
PERHAPS THE GREATEST SERIES EVER WRITTEN!!!, are you enjoying it?

I am loving it.I have never been a "fan" of Mr King but my wife nagged me for 10 years to read it.We have about 5000 books in our house and I was looking for a new read so she sort of insisted I read this series. I like to read 3 books at a time!.A morning read a daytime read and an evening read.the "tower" is my morning read.I am reading "The Map That Changed The World" my daytime read and my evening read is some crappy fiction book to bore me to sleep.

Big Six
08-09-2011, 09:00 PM
Wrapping up The Spy by Clive Cussler...first Isaac Bell I've read (been a Dirk Pitt guy until now)...great stuff.

JackLondon
08-17-2011, 10:16 PM
Reading several right now:

Angle of Repose - fantastic book by Wallace Stegner. Great blend of past and present (1970) as seen by a wheelchair-bound historian, researching his grandparents' roots.

A Disturbance of Fate - a richly realized book of Alternate History, exploring many of the "What Ifs" that would arise in discussing an America in which Bobby Kennedy was NOT assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan in 1968.

also, re-reading Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I go back and forth whether I prefer this one or The Great Gatsby. Both are awe-inspiring. Enjoying it for the third time. First read it way back in high school in 1985.

E93
09-05-2011, 01:14 AM
Omniscience and the Rhetoric of Reason by Sara McClintock

4815162342
09-05-2011, 12:31 PM
Joshua, Matthew and Romans.

Griffins
09-05-2011, 12:53 PM
Travels with Herodotus by Ryszard Kapuscinski
One of my favorite authors, but this is starting to look like not one of his best efforts.

Davalillo
09-05-2011, 02:12 PM
Hoop Crazy by Clair Bee--#6 in the series. You just cannot read these Chip Hilton Books too many times, I have the 23 books on a 4-year rotation. I absolutely hate the reprints however.

benderbroeth
09-05-2011, 07:10 PM
abraham lincoln vampire hunter, by seth grahame-smith

barrysloate
09-07-2011, 07:07 AM
Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?, by Steven Tyler

Pretty funny book, some of it interesting, especially where my own life nearly coincided with Aerosmith's early days in Boston. They used to practice in my BU dormitory (West Campus), and knew someone I knew well, but it occurred a year after I left.

k-dog
09-07-2011, 08:34 AM
"Back Spin" by Harlan Corbin. This is my first time reading any of Corben's books and it appears to be the continuing story of Myron Bolitar...a sports agent who also seems to be a private investigator of sorts. This book is pretty good. It's about a golfer who 20+ years ago lost a huge lead at the US Open and has never been close ever since.He is leading the tournament again after all those years when he finds suddenly finds out that his 15 year old son has been kidnapped. I still have a lot more to read! :)

DaveH
10-12-2011, 08:09 AM
I downloaded a copy of the original "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand a couple of weeks ago (Kindle version). I read it about 40 yrs ago in college and really didn't remember it much. Very appropriate theme for todays political environment. The movie doesn't do it justice. Great book.

dh

mintacular
10-12-2011, 11:45 PM
Rereading Co. Aytch (civil war memoir)

thekingofclout
10-13-2011, 07:27 AM
Same book I've been reading since 2005. :rolleyes:

"A Portrait of Baseball Photography" - By Fogel, Yee, & Oser.

473724737347374

dstraate
10-14-2011, 03:05 PM
The writing prompts of 23 7-year-olds. Riveting stuff. I'll post highlights soon.

Doug
10-18-2011, 07:47 PM
I recently finished reading "The Last Boy" about Mickey Mantle. I can't say that I was overly impressed with it since I didn't really learn anything new, but I would probably recommend it for someone that's not familiar with his life as it is pretty thorough with a lot of information.

Writehooks
10-18-2011, 08:36 PM
The Politics of Rage: George Wallace and the origins of the New Conservatism, by Dan T. Carter.

A fascinating study of the personality and principles of the Alabama populist who became the most influential "loser" in the history of U.S. politics. Great stuff.

Runscott
10-18-2011, 10:06 PM
'Race Ball'. Heard it was great, but just started.

Tinola
10-18-2011, 11:12 PM
I'm receiving my copy of The Glory of Their Times tomorrow or so hopefully. Excited to read it!

teetwoohsix
10-21-2011, 04:02 AM
Right now I have two books going- one is massive, over 1000 pages, and it's called " The Spirit of Seventy Six-The Story Of The American Revolution As Told By Participants" edited by Henry Steele Commager and Richard B. Morris.

The other one is called "The Book Of Kells"- an illustrated introduction to the manuscript in Trinity College Dublin, by Bernard Meehan. Beautiful illustrations in this book.

Sincerely, Clayton

barrysloate
10-21-2011, 11:12 AM
Clayton- a question about the first book: how does one interview participants of the American Revolution? Didn't they die quite a while ago?

benderbroeth
10-21-2011, 10:16 PM
Right now I have two books going- one is massive, over 1000 pages, and it's called " The Spirit of Seventy Six-The Story Of The American Revolution As Told By Participants" edited by Henry Steele Commager and Richard B. Morris.

The other one is called "The Book Of Kells"- an illustrated introduction to the manuscript in Trinity College Dublin, by Bernard Meehan. Beautiful illustrations in this book.

Sincerely, Clayton


the first book is one i would love to read! i love early U.S. history!! tell me how it was!!!

Vol
10-21-2011, 11:08 PM
Rereading Co. Aytch (civil war memoir)

^^That one is one of my favorite books ever.^^



Right now I am reading "The Book of Basketball: The NBA According to the Sports Guy" by Bill Simmons.

teetwoohsix
10-22-2011, 12:28 AM
Clayton- a question about the first book: how does one interview participants of the American Revolution? Didn't they die quite a while ago?

:D Good one Barry :D

I'll just use direct quote straight out of the introduction:

To tell the story of the American Revolution in the words of participants has involved extensive examination of a vast miscellany of sources hitherto discrete: letters, diaries, journals, orderly books, official records of the Congress and of state legislatures, diplomatic correspondence, local histories, Parliamentary debates, the writings of statesmen on both sides of the Atlantic, the voluminous collections and proceedings of historical societies, and many manuscript repositories. It has meant running down countless clues to discover the best account of a battle, or an account written from a new vantage point; the best report of a debate; the most authentic record of a negotiation; the most faithful reflection of an attitude or mood.

benderbroeth- I've really just begun with this book and I'm sure it will take me a long time to reach the end, but I'm already captivated by the amount of detail these guys put into this book. If you like American history, I'd say this is worth reading for sure (so far at least:)).

Sincerely, Clayton

barrysloate
10-22-2011, 06:58 AM
Thanks Clayton- I thought maybe they dug up some 250 year old man who remembered fighting at Bunker Hill.:)

dabigyankeeman
12-19-2011, 07:28 AM
I am just about to start the third of the four books in the great Arthur C. Clarke "Rama" series. These are so great, I had read the first one a long time ago, didnt even know the other 3 existed until recently.

I recently finished the 4 books in his "2001" series, and then will re-read all the Isaac Asimov books in the awesome "Foundation" series, havent read them in over 40 years and dont hardly remember anything about them. In fact I have only read the 3 main ones, now there are others in the series (prequels, whatever), and I have about 8 or 9 of them to read. Yup, I love science fiction.

Love books on the Yankees too, and was just given the book "1921", I will probably wedge that in when I finish the "Rama" books and before I start the "Foundation" books.

jerseygary
12-19-2011, 09:22 PM
I'm about finished with "Red Legs and Black Sox: Edd Roush and the Untold Story of the 1919 World Series" by Susan Dellinger.

It appeals to me on 2 levels - the first being it really has a great section on the Federal League from a personal standpoint because Roush was one of the best in that league and played both of its professional seasons. It's interesting also because Roush was one of the leagues' home-grown stars, he wasn't recruited from the American or National Leagues.

The other reason this book is a darn good read is that it tells the story of the 1919 series from the other side - the victorious Cincinnati Reds. The author (who is Roush's granddaughter) goes into how dirty the game was back then - Roush accuses Hal Chase and Lee Magee of throwing over 20 games during the 1918 season, giving the Cubs the pennant. It also poses interesting questions about why the great Christy Matthewson, Reds Skipper in 1917 and 18, refused to do anything as those two bums threw game after game. According to the author the whole team knew what Magee and Chase were up to and team moral suffered as Matthewson turned a blind eye. Magee was even attacked on the field by a teammate during batting practice because of his crooked play.

Because it's by his granddaughter, it gets a little sappy in parts when the text deals with Roush and his wife's relationship, but that's to be expected and frankly the other information included in this book is more than worth it.

Runscott
01-03-2012, 11:06 AM
I have been thoroughly enjoying Umberto Eco's latest book: The Prague Cemetery. Some of his novels are very esoteric and perhaps difficult, but this one would appeal to Name of the Rose fans.

Oddly, I was given only two books for Christmas - one on Catholicism (by a Catholic) and one on Creationism (by a Creationist). They are short and probably diametrically opposed, so I'll read them next. Should be weird if not entertaining.

Writehooks
01-04-2012, 01:27 AM
"No Regrets", the autobiography of former KISS lead guitarist Ace Frehley.
The Spaceman bares all, from drugs and debauchery to what it finally took to turn his life around. Witty, well-written ... and curiously informative, too.

pgellis
01-04-2012, 08:57 AM
I am reading "America's Quarterback : Bart Starr and the Rise of the NFL".

Got it for Christmas. Almost half way done and very good so far.

Ladder7
01-04-2012, 10:08 AM
*http://images.betterworldbooks.com/160/Red-Sox-Fans-Are-from-Mars-Yankees-Fans-Are-from-Uranus-9781600783470.jpg













*The expressed views and opinions contained within this publication do not necessarily reflect the official position of this Poster nor his affiliates.

dstraate
01-06-2012, 10:50 AM
A Million Little Pieces by James Frey,

Although my mom informed me that Oprah exposed him as a fraud. I guess I'll read it as a fiction offering.:rolleyes:

frankbmd
01-06-2012, 04:06 PM
Tom Robbins makes me smile.http://www.net54baseball.com/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif

90feetaway
01-12-2012, 09:45 PM
Nice Guys Finish Last (Durocher). Ok, it's a 30 year old book but I saw it at the library and decided to give it a read. About third of the way through and interesting so far.

ibuysportsephemera
01-13-2012, 01:43 AM
Just started Miracle Ball by Brian Biegel and it is really good. I think that it was recommended in another thread.

Jeff

HRBAKER
01-14-2012, 04:00 PM
Just finished "The STARK Truth" by Jayson Stark where he opines on the 5 most overrated and underrated players by position. Now about done with "Tony LaRussa" by Rob Rains. Got both for XMas from the kids which must mean they were on closeout at Big Lots or Tuesday Morning.

tiger8mush
01-18-2012, 07:05 PM
"Satch, Dizzy, & Rapid Robert: The Wild Saga of Interracial Baseball Before Jackie Robinson". The information is great - hearing about Dizzy Dean and Bob Feller barnstorming against Negro Leaguers. But I'm not a fan of the writing style. I don't know how to explain it, but by 1/2 way thru the book I just got tired of reading it. The author Timothy Gay puts out great stories but the delivery just doesn't capture my attention. Too long of a book perhaps? 3 stars.

Now finishing reading Ann Rule's "Dead by Sunset". She's a true crime author, and I'm just getting into her books. Great author IMO, only took me about 2 weeks to get thru ~ 380 pages which is like a record for me. 5 stars.

RichardSimon
01-19-2012, 08:56 PM
The Autobiography of Mark Twain.

GoudeyJim
01-22-2012, 08:54 PM
Just finished "In the Heart of the Seas: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex" by Nathaniel Philbrick - true story and it is an incredible read. I highly recommend it.

Just started "The Big Bam: The Life and Times of Babe Ruth" by Leigh Montville. So far, very interesting read.

nebboy
01-22-2012, 09:30 PM
I downloaded a copy of the original "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand a couple of weeks ago (Kindle version). I read it about 40 yrs ago in college and really didn't remember it much. Very appropriate theme for todays political environment. The movie doesn't do it justice. Great book.

dh

You get a +3 for this one - A fan of Ayn Rand works even my dog is named AYNNIE.

Im reading;
Wilber "Bullet" Rogan and the Kansas City Monarchs
Working ath the Ballpark
BASEBALL in the GARDEN of EDEN
all OK to Good reads

pgellis
01-30-2012, 10:11 AM
Just started The Glory of Their Times. Loving it so far.

drc
01-31-2012, 02:28 PM
I'm reading Diary of Anne Frank for the first time. My urban condo building has a little community library next to a elevator door, with the books donated by the residents, and this one was sitting there as I was waiting for the elevator. The books even have color coded stickers so you know when to return it.

Jason
02-01-2012, 07:40 PM
Baseball Americana:The Library Of Congress' Collection.Half pictures,half information.Just the way I like them.

Vol
02-10-2012, 04:25 PM
"Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball's Longest Game"?

Heard the author Dan Barry on a podcast and it sounds like a very interesting look at not only minor league baseball, but the fans who root and support them. Just bought it and was wondering if any one else has read it.

Wymers Auction
02-16-2012, 08:44 PM
Net 54 posts!!!

Runscott
02-17-2012, 03:02 PM
I just received a copy of "The Card". Fascinating stuff, even though there is a lot of hogwash in it. It was interesting to read about people who I know, like MW. It was disappointing to see that the writer had given the two Cincinnati fraudsters a photo and any cred whatsoever. Finally, I'm wondering if Ray will ever tell the world where he got the card - perhaps he has, and I missed it?

Runscott
02-17-2012, 03:04 PM
Just started The Glory of Their Times. Loving it so far.

Phil, follow it up with the c.d. - it will be the best money you ever spent. I feel like I know those guys I've listened to it so many times.

brett 75
03-17-2012, 08:22 AM
The Standard Catalog of Baseball Cards! Is there anything else? :D

tiger8mush
03-17-2012, 08:46 AM
"The pitch that killed", a book about Carl Mays throwing the ball that killed Ray Chapman in 1920. Batters didn't wear helmets at the time.

Great, easy read so far. Interesting that, according to the book, Carl Mays and Babe Ruth were brought up at the same time w/the Red Sox and there were more expectations for Mays.

frankbmd
03-17-2012, 02:08 PM
You get a +3 for this one - A fan of Ayn Rand works even my dog is named AYNNIE.

Im reading;
Wilber "Bullet" Rogan and the Kansas City Monarchs
Working ath the Ballpark
BASEBALL in the GARDEN of EDEN
all OK to Good reads

Have read "Atlas Shrugged" and "The Fountainhead" in the last year. Your dog is no doubt wagging her tail by now:). Currently I'm trying to get through "Democracy in America", an increasingly foreign concept:eek:. Between chapters I'm picking up "Pursuit of Honor". If Aynnie doesn't like Mitch Rapp, there no tellin' what might happen to her.;)

Crazy 08 was a good baseball read recently:D. The most interesting baseball book, however, if you ever played table games with dice, is "The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop." by Robert Coover:cool:.

This post to be submitted for this year's Smile Award:confused:.

jbbama
03-25-2012, 12:04 PM
Willie Mays The Life, The Legend. Mays grew up about 30 min. from where i live and i am familiar with a lot of the local places in the book (which makes it more interesting)........i am about 1/3 of the way through. Today there are a lot of stories about Mays being an a(hole) and grouchy oldman, i am hoping for some insight on how that happened. According to this book, he was happy go lucky and always smiling and joking around as a young player. Interesting book so far.

Runscott
03-28-2012, 11:28 AM
Sports Illustrated 'Baseball Preview' issue. I don't normally read S.I., but in the absence of any reasonably current baseball preview magazine (Sporting News is apparently not producing one this year, and all the others are so old that they don't even show Pujols or Fielder on the correct rosters), I took a chance.

What a great read. They did a very creative job of previewing each team and threw in a lot of interesting side-bar stuff, all while maintaining the integrity of a season preview magazine - good roster info, etc. But the real fun was the article about Mickey Mantle at the back, by the author of 'The Last Boy', built around an error in the book where she stated that Sullivan (Red Sox) had died, when he was in fact alive and kicking at 82.

dstraate
03-29-2012, 09:49 AM
Now I'm onto Hunger Games, as I had to see what all the fuss was about. I have to admit that I love these smaller books. They make me feel like a much more prolific reader.

saltire
03-30-2012, 03:03 AM
"Luckiest Man - The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig" by Jonathan Eig.

Hopefully, next up will be "Banzai Babe Ruth" by Rob Fitts.

bobbvc
04-08-2012, 09:12 PM
Finishing up "Mint Condition" by Dave Jamieson for the first time. Re-reading "The Loom of Ruin" by Sam McPheeters (former singer of obscure bands, Born Against, Men's Recovery Project and Wrangler Brutes) great and funny book if you like Dark satire.

Jlighter
07-18-2012, 08:17 PM
thought maybe I should revive this thread. Im reading Pinstripe Empire and A Universe from Nothing.

gorrister
07-18-2012, 09:42 PM
The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle

daves_resale_shop
07-18-2012, 09:54 PM
Currently workign on "The Luckiest Man" about Gehrig... a great read, I highly recommend it...

71buc
07-19-2012, 11:46 PM
I read three to four at a time. Currently I am enjoying The Killings of Stanley Ketchel, the Art of Fielding, A Flame of Pure Fire: Jack Dempsey and the Roaring '20s, and October Men.

Exhibitman
07-22-2012, 09:06 AM
I recently finished the Game of Thrones books; great stuff and eagerly awaiting the next one. I am now through 7 of the 8 Sookie Stackhouse novels. Also a lot of fun, and the stories markedly diverge from the HBO series within a book or two, which is nice. For the National trip I have the new book about Mickey Cohen, "Mickey Cohen: The Life and Crimes of L.A.'s Notorious Mobster" by Tere Tereba. Also likely to re-read an old favorite, "Stranger in a Strange Land" by Robert Heinlein.