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08-17-2007, 11:04 AM
Posted By: <b>Jason L</b><p>Just wondering what people might say to this, given that we have this great new site...<br /><br />Assuming you collect both pre-war and postwar cards, are you more or less disciplined with your collecting focus in pre-war vs. post-war?<br /><br />I am far less focused in my post-war collecting, probably because there are more issues to pick from, but also I think the cards can be cheaper, on average. <br />...That said, my most expensive card is post-war, so I guess I don't know what I am talking about! <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14><br /><br />

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08-17-2007, 03:33 PM
Posted By: <b>Neal Kane</b><p>tends to shift all over the place. I mostly own post war, but I enjoy owning several pre war examples, and look to obtain a few choice others. <br /><br />My favorite era of cards (and baseball actually) is the 50's.

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08-17-2007, 03:44 PM
Posted By: <b>Phil Garry</b><p>Baseball Hall of Fame Rookie Cards for me.........

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08-17-2007, 03:55 PM
Posted By: <b>Jason L</b><p>You are saying that you have been equally one-minded (HOFer RCs) on each side of the pre- and post-war fences?<br /><br />I commend you for your focus!

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08-17-2007, 04:35 PM
Posted By: <b>Paul S</b><p>For buying purposes -- not that I am currently going out of my way to buy -- I am tending to focus more on pre-war. There are many issues that I'd like to type collect in the future.<br /><br />Jason, if money dictates your discipline:<br />I am not surprised that a post-war card(s) would be your most expensive. I myself am surprised that some of my cards go for what they do. The right post-war card in wonderful condition can be valued high, and it's not always the HOFers either. Alot of my post-wars can get more than my middle condition pre-war HOFers. I was just looking at the Mile High auction results. My advice, locate a cache of 54 Bowman in PSA 8 and above and sell them to get some pre-wars, if that's your thing.

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08-17-2007, 05:26 PM
Posted By: <b>Anthony</b><p>I work on sets from a few eras at any given time. It's the Davillilo strategy, if a set or era gets hot you focus on another one till it cools down. Saved me tons of money over the years. <br /> All things being equal I go for the cards that come up less often. Keep a library of auction catalogs and after a while you can see what changes hands more often than other things, and jump on something that is rarely seen.

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08-17-2007, 08:32 PM
Posted By: <b>Phil Garry</b><p>Yes, Jason. I do both sides, pre-war and post-war HOF RC's.

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08-17-2007, 08:55 PM
Posted By: <b>Ken McMillan</b><p>Jason,<br /><br />My focus is very disciplined. I love my Cubbies and collect all the Topps and Topps updates sets with errors and variations for post war. For prewar, I collect T207 Cubs and E121 series of 120 Yankees and Elmer Miller cards only. I like to look at T207 and oj older sets, but have not collected them as recent. I also have an extra 1955 topps double header card and some extra 1959 topps cubs commons and a 1956 topps team card.<br /><br />Ken

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08-20-2007, 07:55 PM
Posted By: <b>identify7</b><p>My set spans all periods, including the present. I shift my thrust from era to era in an effort to maintain balance as I complete my objectives. Right now, I'm back in the 19th century primarilly.

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08-20-2007, 09:19 PM
Posted By: <b>Marc S.</b><p>with post-war cards...as there are so many, I try and collect relatively fewer of them. With pre-war, I tend to move towards rarity and sometimes pick up some real beaters just to have one in my collection. <br /><br />~ms

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08-21-2007, 05:11 AM
Posted By: <b>JimCrandell</b><p>More disciplined on pre-war. I would likely be very hesitent on starting a new pre-war set but pretty much any 50s or 60s set in any sport that I did not have that was in 8 or better I would buy.<br /><br />Jim

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08-21-2007, 11:55 AM
Posted By: <b>boxingcardman</b><p>When you can find stuff at five bucks or less in top condition, buying a dud just isn't a consideration that prevents you from going forward. I know I bought a bunch of high grade postwar at the National beause it was so darn cheap--yet I'd basically given up on actively collecting postwar. But when I am seeing mid-1970s Ryans in PSA 8 for $5 each, I gotta pull the trigger. <br /><br />Edited to say: and in many cases, followed shortly thereafter by a cracking sound as the cards are shucked from their slabs and added to my raw sets...

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08-21-2007, 12:29 PM
Posted By: <b>Ted Zanidakis</b><p>ADAM W<br /><br />You bring out a great point......whether it's on ebay or at big BB card shows, there are some amazing bargains to be<br />gotten. For example, I used to work on 1949 Bowman's and I used to pay $40-50 for ExMt Hi#s. Nowadays, you can <br />get these same cards (graded) for as low as $10-15. <br /><br />And, I wonder....why do these sellers waste their time and money to get these cards graded ?<br /><br />The major market shift to pre-war stuff has to be really hurting the '50s - '70s card market in the Ex to ExMt category.<br /><br />TED Z

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08-21-2007, 12:51 PM
Posted By: <b>Jason L</b><p>totally agree.<br />I picked up a handful of 1960s football a couple months back because it was cheap - and I don't even collect football cards!<br /><br />no such thing as a bargain in pre-war anymore.<br />Nothing like pricing to challenge your discipline <img src="/images/happy.gif" height=14 width=14><br />

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08-21-2007, 07:12 PM
Posted By: <b>boxingcardman</b><p>And the best part is finding cards from my childhood (the real one, not the current extended one) at ridiculously low prices and pack-fresh. I paid under $2 a card for raw hockey, football and basketball HOFers from the 1970s. And those cards were really nice and from sets that are notorious for print and centering flaws.